Ancestry of the house of mewar

  • Rawal Guhil 566-586 CE

    There was this prosperous Rajput State of Vadnagar/Vallabhi in Gujarat which was established during the early decades of 4th Century. Rawal Guhil, the founder of Mewar Dynasty was the descendant of Siladitya VI (the King of Vallabhi, Gujarat). When Guhil’s mother was on pilgrimage, Vallabhi was invaded and destroyed. According to Aghatpur inscription dated Vikram Samvat 1034, Guhil travelled from Anandpur (Vallabhi) to Mewar in present day Rajasthan.Guhil survived due to his mother Rani Pushpavati and established the Guhilot dynasty, the precursor of the Mewar dynasty which is also recorded in Chittor inscription of Vikram Samvat 1331 CE, Abu inscription dated Vikram Samvat 1342 , Ranpur (Ranakpur) dated Vikram Samvat 1496 and Kumbhalgarh Prashasti of Vikram Samvat 1517.
    According to the Archaeological Survey of India; report by Carlie, 2000 silver coins on which ‘Shri Guhil’ is inscribed were found hoarded near Agra. Guhil was a powerful ruler, as he actually started an era of his own. The whole of South - Western Mewar lay within his dominions which probably included some more areas even outside proper Rajasthan.

  • Rawal Bhoj 586-606 CE

    Rawal Bhoj succeeded Rawal Guhil. In the stone inscriptions and in other ancient documents (Khayats), after Guhil they have named Bhoj as his successor or they have called him Bhojaditya which is mentioned in the stone inscriptions found at Aghatpur dated Vikram Samvat 1034, Chittor inscription of Vikram Samvat 1331 CE, Abu inscription dated Vikram Samvat 1342 , Ranpur (Ranakpur) dated Vikram Samvat 1496 and Kumbhalgarh Prashasti of Vikram Samvat 1517.
    In the Abu inscription, Bhoj has been described as a worshipper of Shripati (Vishnu), two of his copper coins have also been discovered. According to Kadmal Copper plates Vikram Samvat 1140, Bhoja constructed a tank at present day Shree Eklingnath ji Temple premises.

  • RAWAL MAHENDRA I 606-626CE

    Rawal Bhoj was succeeded by Mahendra I. It is recorded in inscriptions found at  Aghatpur dated Vikram Samvat 1034 and Kumbhalgarh Prashasti of Vikram Samvat 1517.

  • RAWAL Naga (Nagaditya) 626 - 646 CE

     Naga (Nagaditya ) became the ruler of Mewar succeeding Rawal Mahendra I as mentioned in inscriptions found at Aghatpur dated Vikram Samvat 1034 and Kumbhalgarh Prashasti of Vikram Samvat 1517. According to folklores, the town of Nagda, earlier known as Nagdriha was established by Nagaditya, and later he died fighting the Bhils. Nagda was the capital city of Mewar and also a trade centre.

  • RAWAL SHILADITYA 646 - 661 CE

    The successor to Naga (Nagaditya) was Shiladitya. In stone inscription found at Samoli village dated Vikram Samvat 703, the ruling period of Shiladitya is mentioned. It is mentioned in the stone inscription that he was the conqueror of enemies, brings bliss to Gods, Brahmins and Teachers and is most victorious on the earth. This inscription describes the building of the temple of Aranyavasini (Goddess of forests) by Jejaka, the leader of a merchant’s guild. This is the first evidence of mining in Mewar.
    It is believed that the zinc and copper mines at Zawar were excavated during Shiladitya’s reign, thereby causing tremendous increase in employment. Thus, Mewar witnessed immense prosperity which tempted the outside merchants to settle there, as mentioned in the inscription.  A copper coin of the period of Shiladitya has been found which has his name on one side but on the other side the words have been obliterated. In stone inscriptions found at Aghatpur dated Vikram Samvat 1034, Chittor inscription of Vikram Samvat 1331 CE, Abu inscription dated Vikram Samvat 1342 , Ranpur (Ranakpur) dated Vikram Samvat 1496 and Kumbhalgarh Prashasti of Vikram Samvat 1517; the name of Shiladitya is mentioned as Sheel. Shiladitya patronised the artist Shrirangdhar as quoted in Tara Nath - History of Buddhism in India. Lama Tara Nath describes that the old western school of art was developed by the artist Shrirangdhar under the patronage of King Shiladitya of Maru country. In evidence, a good number of sculptures dated 6th to 8th centuries are also found in the nearby area.

  • Aprajeet 661 - 688 CE

    Naag or Nagaditya builds the capital at Nagda, with beautifully sculpted temples commemorating the rise of the Suryavanshi Kings of Mewar.

  • Mahendra II 688 - 716 CE

    Naag or Nagaditya builds the capital at Nagda, with beautifully sculpted temples commemorating the rise of the Suryavanshi Kings of Mewar.

  • Bappa Rawal 734 - 753 CE

    Bapa the Fountainhead
    Bapa, the fountainhead of piety and humility for the Guhilot Kings of Mewar, is the true founder of the dynasty's supremacy among Rajputs. 

    Bapa moves the capital of Mewar from Nagda to the mighty fortress city of Chittor. In the face of Muslim invasions across the western borders of Rajputana, Bapa unites the smaller states of Ajmer and Jaisalmer to repel the invaders.
    Bapa thus is setting the tradition of pious humility which has remained the hallmark of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar. He builds a temple dedicated to Eklingji, with an icon of granite as pure and clear as a diamond. 

    Bapa Rawal (his real name is Kalbhoj Bappa) follows the cardinal principles which Harit Rashi lays down for him as Dewan of Eklingji: respect for Mankind, service to the community and maintenance of ancient Vedic culture. 

    These precepts have never been forgotten and are the enduring, living heritage of the House of Mewar - the world's longest-serving dynasty.

  • Rawal Khuman I 753-773 CE

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Rawal Mattat 773 - 793 CE

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Rawal Bhartri Bhatt I 793 - 813 CE

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Rawal Sinh 813 CE - 828 CE

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Rawal Khuman II 828 - 853 CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Mahayak 853 - 878 CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Khuman III 878 CE - 926 CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Bhartri Bhatt II 926 - 951 CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Allat 951 CE - 971CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Narwahan 971 - 973 CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Saliwahan 973 - 977 CE

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Rawal Shakti Kumar 977 - 993 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Amba Prasad 993 - 1007 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Shuchivarma 1007 - 1021 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Narvarma 1021 - 1035 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Kirtivarma 1035 - 1051 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Yograj 1051 - 1068 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Vairath 1068 - 1088 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Hanspal 1088 - 1103 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Vair Singh 1103 - 1107 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Vijai Singh 1107 - 1116 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Ari Singh 1116 - 1138 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Chaudh Singh 1138 - 1148 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Vikram Singh 1148- 1158 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Ran Singh 1158 - 1168 CE

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Rawal Khshem Singh 1168 - 1172 CE

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Rawal Samant Singh 1172 - 1179 CE

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Rawal Kumar Singh 1179 - 1191 CE

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Rawal Mathan Singh 1191 - 1211 CE

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Rawal Padam Singh 1211 - 1213 CE

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Rawal Jetra Singh 1213 - 1252 CE

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Rawal Tej Singh 1252 - 1273 CE

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Rawal Samar Singh 1273 CE - 1302 CE

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Rawal Ratan Singh 1302-1303 CE

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Maharana Hamir Singh 1326 - 1364 CE

    Rana Ajay Singh of Shishoda nominates his more meritorious nephew Hamir as his heir (destined to redeem the glory of Mewar)in preference to his son Sajjan Singh , who in turn shifts to Sattar(Chatrapati Shivaji's ancestor ) (Tod pg.216). Earlier Bapa Rawal also nominates his worthier younger son as heir in preference to less worthy elder son who in turn moves to Gujrat to start the line of Asil Gehlotes(Tod Pg. 197).

    In 1326, Hamir Singh regains Chittor and becomes the first ruler of Mewar to use the honorific 'Rana'. A period of relative peace and prosperity begins. 

    Rana Hamir Singh becomes a bridge to the past, adhering to the principles of trusteeship laid down by Bapa Rawal and restoring the glory of Vedic traditions. 

    The Guhilots of Mewar adopt the clan name of Sisodia. Rana Hamir Singh emerges as the 'sole Hindu prince of power now left in India : all the ancient dynasties being crushed.'

  • Maharana Kshetra Singh 1364 - 1382 CE

    Rana Ajay Singh of Shishoda nominates his more meritorious nephew Hamir as his heir (destined to redeem the glory of Mewar)in preference to his son Sajjan Singh , who in turn shifts to Sattar(Chatrapati Shivaji's ancestor ) (Tod pg.216). Earlier Bapa Rawal also nominates his worthier younger son as heir in preference to less worthy elder son who in turn moves to Gujrat to start the line of Asil Gehlotes(Tod Pg. 197).

    In 1326, Hamir Singh regains Chittor and becomes the first ruler of Mewar to use the honorific 'Rana'. A period of relative peace and prosperity begins. 

    Rana Hamir Singh becomes a bridge to the past, adhering to the principles of trusteeship laid down by Bapa Rawal and restoring the glory of Vedic traditions. 

    The Guhilots of Mewar adopt the clan name of Sisodia. Rana Hamir Singh emerges as the 'sole Hindu prince of power now left in India : all the ancient dynasties being crushed.'

  • Maharana Lakha 1382 - 1421 CE

    A golden age dawns for the Maharanas of Mewar. 
    Their triumph over adversity, their political will to consolidate the State and develop every aspect of Mewari culture, and the way they are moulding the character of Rajputs is awe-inspiring. The impact of their achievements is still visible, centuries later... 
     

  • Maharana Mokal 1421 - 1433 CE


    Maharana Lakha proves to be a prolific builder of palaces and temples, a fine patron of the arts, and a developer of the recently-discovered silver and zinc mines. With Chonda, establishing the Chondawat clan, an important precedent is set : the mantle of Rana passes on to the younger son.

  • Maharana Kumbha 1433 - 1468 CE

    Rana Kumbha provides a burst of creative energy and military might which makes Chittor the centre of medieval India. As a builder of forts, he is unparalleled; as a patron and promoter of the arts, he is a trend-setter; and as a military leader, he is supreme. 

    Rana Kumbha, hailed as one of the greatest military generals of the Sisodia Rajputs, is a ruler of varied talents. A man as intensely committed to literature and music as to the rigours of warfare. 

    Rana Kumbha reigns for over 30 years, from 1433 to 1468, and consolidates Mewar's independence as a Hindu kingdom. Like his illustrious predecessors, Rana Kumbha is a defender of Mewar's territories, not ready to accept the sway of the Delhi Sultans over Gujarat, Malwa and parts of Rajasthan. 
     

  • Maharana Udai Singh I 1468 - 1473 CE

    Mewar is invaded several times and successfully defended by Rana Kumbha. In 1437, Sultan Mahmud, King of Malwa, is taken prisoner after a pitched battle and Rana Kumbha demonstrates his magnanimity as a victor. Mahmud is treated as a guest and then released without demands for ransom. The hallmark of Mewari conduct in victory is established once again. 

    Rana Kumbha is a relentless builder: constructing no less than 32 of the 84 fortresses in Mewar. The monumental fort Kumbhalgarh, named after the Rana himself, is a majestic fort-city with 36 km-long stone walls encircling the hill. But it is in Chittor that Rana Kumbha's most impressive construction is seen: Vijay Sthambh built by Rana Khumba is the so called Victory Tower . The Jain Community built the Keerti Sthambh as a Tower of Prestige, as during Khumba's reign the Jain community also flourished due to peace and protection of the Rana. 

    Rana Kumbha's vast literary output - dramas in Sanskrit, books on varied subjects like genealogy, grammar, music compositions - underscore his multifaceted talents. 

    His erudition, his commitment to artistic excellence and his military might make Rana Kumbha one of the greatest personalities, not just of Mewar and Rajasthan, but of medieval India.

  • Maharana Raimal 1473 - 1509 CE

    Mewar is invaded several times and successfully defended by Rana Kumbha. In 1437, Sultan Mahmud, King of Malwa, is taken prisoner after a pitched battle and Rana Kumbha demonstrates his magnanimity as a victor. Mahmud is treated as a guest and then released without demands for ransom. The hallmark of Mewari conduct in victory is established once again. 

    Rana Kumbha is a relentless builder: constructing no less than 32 of the 84 fortresses in Mewar. The monumental fort Kumbhalgarh, named after the Rana himself, is a majestic fort-city with 36 km-long stone walls encircling the hill. But it is in Chittor that Rana Kumbha's most impressive construction is seen: Vijay Sthambh built by Rana Khumba is the so called Victory Tower . The Jain Community built the Keerti Sthambh as a Tower of Prestige, as during Khumba's reign the Jain community also flourished due to peace and protection of the Rana. 

    Rana Kumbha's vast literary output - dramas in Sanskrit, books on varied subjects like genealogy, grammar, music compositions - underscore his multifaceted talents. 

    His erudition, his commitment to artistic excellence and his military might make Rana Kumbha one of the greatest personalities, not just of Mewar and Rajasthan, but of medieval India.

  • Maharana Sangram Singh I 1509 - 1528 CE

    Mewar is invaded several times and successfully defended by Rana Kumbha. In 1437, Sultan Mahmud, King of Malwa, is taken prisoner after a pitched battle and Rana Kumbha demonstrates his magnanimity as a victor. Mahmud is treated as a guest and then released without demands for ransom. The hallmark of Mewari conduct in victory is established once again. 

    Rana Kumbha is a relentless builder: constructing no less than 32 of the 84 fortresses in Mewar. The monumental fort Kumbhalgarh, named after the Rana himself, is a majestic fort-city with 36 km-long stone walls encircling the hill. But it is in Chittor that Rana Kumbha's most impressive construction is seen: Vijay Sthambh built by Rana Khumba is the so called Victory Tower . The Jain Community built the Keerti Sthambh as a Tower of Prestige, as during Khumba's reign the Jain community also flourished due to peace and protection of the Rana. 

    Rana Kumbha's vast literary output - dramas in Sanskrit, books on varied subjects like genealogy, grammar, music compositions - underscore his multifaceted talents. 

    His erudition, his commitment to artistic excellence and his military might make Rana Kumbha one of the greatest personalities, not just of Mewar and Rajasthan, but of medieval India.

  • Maharana Ratan Singh II 1528 - 1531 CE

    Chittor, the most famous symbol of Rajput resistance, is targeted by Muslim invaders. Dogged by the vengeful Sultan of Gujarat, the descendants of the mighty Sanga find themselves besieged in 1535. 

    While a safe haven is found for the youngest son of Sanga, Udai Singh, Chittor witnesses the jauhar or self-immolation of 13,000 women led by the Rajmata Karnavati. Courage and honour in the face of utmost adversity is demonstrated yet again by the Sisodia Rajputs. 

  • Maharana Vikramaditya 1531 - 1536 CE

    Chittor is in ruins, plundered and sacked by the Sultan's forces, but more threatening is the conflict within the Maharana's family. Udai Singh, the sole surviving direct descendant of Bapa Rawal, is saved by the heroic act of his foster-mother, Panna Dai. Among the heroes and legends of the Royal House of Mewar, the humble name of Panna Dai is revered for her selfless act of loyalty. 

    Saved by her, Udai Singh becomes the Maharana and founds the city of Udaipur on the shores of Lake Pichola in 1559. Guided by an ascetic's blessing, he builds the city and shifts the capital from Chittor. 

    Eight years later in 1567, Chittor is besieged by Akbar's army. It signals the end of Chittor, the seat of power which Bapa Rawal had chosen as the capital of Mewar. Over 30,000 inhabitants of the fort seek and find death in battle, adding yet another chapter in Mewar's glorious history of honourable resistance. 
    As Chittor is reduced to ruins, Udaipur becomes the centre of the Mewari world, a fabled city secured by valleys and lakes, not reliant on the old system of forts and ramparts.

  • Maharana Udai Singh II 1537 - 1572 CE

    Chittor is in ruins, plundered and sacked by the Sultan's forces, but more threatening is the conflict within the Maharana's family. Udai Singh, the sole surviving direct descendant of Bapa Rawal, is saved by the heroic act of his foster-mother, Panna Dai. Among the heroes and legends of the Royal House of Mewar, the humble name of Panna Dai is revered for her selfless act of loyalty. 

    Saved by her, Udai Singh becomes the Maharana and founds the city of Udaipur on the shores of Lake Pichola in 1559. Guided by an ascetic's blessing, he builds the city and shifts the capital from Chittor. 

    Eight years later in 1567, Chittor is besieged by Akbar's army. It signals the end of Chittor, the seat of power which Bapa Rawal had chosen as the capital of Mewar. Over 30,000 inhabitants of the fort seek and find death in battle, adding yet another chapter in Mewar's glorious history of honourable resistance. 
    As Chittor is reduced to ruins, Udaipur becomes the centre of the Mewari world, a fabled city secured by valleys and lakes, not reliant on the old system of forts and ramparts.

  • Maharana Pratap Singh I 1572 - 1597 CE

    Undaunted heroism, inflexible fortitude, pride, honour and perseverance: Rana Pratap exemplifies the noble values and traditions of the Suryavanshi Kings. 
    When he succeeds as the Rana, the state of Mewar is virtually without a capital, without resources, but it still is a tiny pool of resistance in the vast ocean of the Mughal Empire. Mewar is encircled by Akbar's allies: Marwar, Amber, Bikaner, Bundi acknowledge Mughal supremacy. Only Rana Pratap remains steadfast to his legendary vows that he would never offer obeisance to Delhi as long as it remained under foreign yolk nor even be summoned to Delhi. 

    The glory of Rana Pratap is inspiration for all times. 

    Though Chittor is sacked and plundered by Akbar's forces, the spirit of Sisodia Rajputs is unbroken. It is Rana Pratap who still refuses to acknowledge Akbar as the Mughal emperor and vows never to appear in his court in Delhi. 
     

  • Maharana Amar Singh I 1597- 1620 CE

    Amar Singh succeeds Rana Pratap, and though Akbar leaves Mewar in peace, it is in Jahangir's reign that 17 pitched battles are fought over 10 years. Amar Singh, a true son of his famous father, routs the Mughal forces time and again. But worn down with war and financial losses, Amar Singh negotiates peace with the Mughals. 

    An honourable compromise between Mewar and the Mughals ushers in an era of peace: energy is devoted into building Udaipur and working for the welfare of its people.

  • Maharana Karan Singh 1620 - 1628 CE

    An abdication, an unusual friendship and peace mark the beginning of a new era. 

    Maharana Amar Singh abdicates in favour of his son, Karan Singh who, at a young age, has been exposed to cordial overtures in Jehangir's court. With young Prince Khurram, he forges a strong friendship. And when the Mughal Prince is exiled, he turns to the Maharana for help. Jagmandir Island Palace, in the middle of Lake Pichola, becomes a safe haven for him. The Suryavanshi ideal - of helping those in distress, irrespective of religion or past enemity - is upheld by Karan Singh, just as it had been by Rana Kumbha and Rana Sanga.

  • Maharana Jagat Singh I 1628 - 1652 CE

    Maharana Jagat Singh is credited with being the greatest builder of the dynasty: in his reign, the Jagmandir Island Palace is completed. 

    Painting too is reaching its pinnacle of perfection in these times. Illustrations of religious books and manuscripts, court scenes and important activities are documented for posterity. 

    The quest for excellence in architecture and the arts in Mewar remains unparalleled in the history of medieval India.

  • Maharana Raj Singh I 1652 - 1680 CE

    Peace and respite from war brings with it the responsibility of building Udaipur, developing the City Palace, enlarging the Lake Pichola and creating an effective fresh water network. While Rana Raj Singh builds the Rajsamund Lake to save his people from debilitating drought and famine.It was during his reign that Shrinathji came to Nathdwara and Dwarkadish came to Kankaroli i.e they took shelter in Mewar due to Aurangzeb's destrustive nature.

    Rana Jai Singh constructs the Jaisamund Lake - one of the largest artificial lakes of its time in the world.

  • Maharana Jai Singh 1680 - 1698 CE

    Peace and respite from war brings with it the responsibility of building Udaipur, developing the City Palace, enlarging the Lake Pichola and creating an effective fresh water network. While Rana Raj Singh builds the Rajsamund Lake to save his people from debilitating drought and famine.It was during his reign that Shrinathji came to Nathdwara and Dwarkadish came to Kankaroli i.e they took shelter in Mewar due to Aurangzeb's destrustive nature.

    Rana Jai Singh constructs the Jaisamund Lake - one of the largest artificial lakes of its time in the world.

  • Maharana Amar Singh II 1698 - 1710 CE

    Peace and respite from war brings with it the responsibility of building Udaipur, developing the City Palace, enlarging the Lake Pichola and creating an effective fresh water network. While Rana Raj Singh builds the Rajsamund Lake to save his people from debilitating drought and famine.It was during his reign that Shrinathji came to Nathdwara and Dwarkadish came to Kankaroli i.e they took shelter in Mewar due to Aurangzeb's destrustive nature.

    Rana Jai Singh constructs the Jaisamund Lake - one of the largest artificial lakes of its time in the world.

  • Maharana Sangram Singh II 1710 - 1734 CE

    1. Naath Singh(Bagor, Peelghar) -heem Singh ,Surat Singh ,Jalam Singh (Netawal) ,Bhagwat Singh (Peeladar) ,Shivdaan Singh,Sardar Singh (69) ,Sher Singh ,Swaroop Singh (70) ,Sardar Singh , Samrath Singh ,Shakti Singh ,Sohan Singh ,Shambu Singh (71) ,Sajjan Singh (72)

    2. Bagh Singh(Karjali) - Hariron Singh,Daulat Singh, Anoop Singh, Surat Singh, Chatar Singh, Himmat Singh, Lakshman Singh, Jagat Singh, Abhey Singh , Karan Singh

    3. Arjun Singh(Shivrati) - Shiv Singh Bahadur Singh, Suraj Mal Daulat Singh (Dhaneria), Dul Singh, Gaj Singh, Surat Singh

    4. Fateh Singh (73) - Himmat Singh, Shivdaan Singh, Pratap Singh, Hamir Singh, Udai Singh.

    5. Bhagwat Singh (75) - Narendra Singh, Arjun Singh

  • Maharana Jagat Singh II 1734 - 1751 CE

    Despair, darkness and the testing times. After centuries of proud resistance and defence against the Turks and the Mughals, Mewar is humbled by the militancy of the marauding Marathas. He built the palace of Jagniwas now the famous Lake Palace Hotel. 
    In Veer Vinod, the poet Shyamaldas, traces the Kshatriya lineage of Shivaji from Rahap, one of the sons of Kshema Singh. 
    From 1736, when the first Maratha invasion of Mewar takes place in the reign of Maharana Jagat Singh II, the Marathas begin extracting huge tributes and payments, destroying the economic base of Mewar. 
    For almost 40 years, none of the Maharanas are able to counter the greed, rapaciousness and open looting by the Maratha overlords. The glorious descendants of Ikshvaku and Ram, the Maharanas are reduced to abject poverty, unable to lift themselves and their state from the morass of adversity.

  • Maharana Pratap Singh II 1751 - 1754 CE

    In Veer Vinod, the poet Shyamaldas, traces the Kshatriya lineage of Shivaji from Rahap, one of the sons of Kshema Singh. 

    From 1736, when the first Maratha invasion of Mewar takes place in the reign of Maharana Jagat Singh II, the Marathas begin extracting huge tributes and payments, destroying the economic base of Mewar. 

    For almost 40 years, none of the Maharanas are able to counter the greed, rapaciousness and open looting by the Maratha overlords. The glorious descendants of Ikshvaku and Ram, the Maharanas are reduced to abject poverty, unable to lift themselves and their state from the morass of adversity.

  • Maharana Raj Singh II r. 1754-1761 CE

    Despair, darkness and the testing times. After centuries of proud resistance and defence against the Turks and the Mughals, Mewar is humbled by the militancy of the marauding Marathas. He built the palace of Jagniwas now the famous Lake Palace Hotel. 

    In Veer Vinod, the poet Shyamaldas, traces the Kshatriya lineage of Shivaji from Rahap, one of the sons of Kshema Singh. 

    From 1736, when the first Maratha invasion of Mewar takes place in the reign of Maharana Jagat Singh II, the Marathas begin extracting huge tributes and payments, destroying the economic base of Mewar. 

  • Maharana Ari Singh II r. 1761-1773 CE

    Despair, darkness and the testing times. After centuries of proud resistance and defence against the Turks and the Mughals, Mewar is humbled by the militancy of the marauding Marathas. He built the palace of Jagniwas now the famous Lake Palace Hotel. 

  • Maharana Hameer Singh II 1773 to 1778 CE

    Victorian stability provides the foundation for the restoration of the lost glory and dignity of the Sisodia dynasty. After the dark days of the Maratha marauders and the civil war, Udaipur is now on the long road to recovery.
    Maharana Sardar Singh, adopted from the Bagore branch of the family, is still caught up in the debts of the past. It is his younger brother, Maharana Swarup Singh who begins the painful journey to recovery. He remains firm on upholding Rajput traditions in the face of British instructions to reform. During the 1857 Mutiny, the Maharana shelters the British refugees on Jagmandir Island Palace and proves, once again, that loyalty and trust are core values being upheld by Kshatriya Kings.

  • Maharana Bheem Singh 1778 - 1828 CE

    Mewar's misfortunes multiply as wars of succession break out, with the different Rajput clans pitted against each other. Maharana Bhim Singh is installed as the ruler at the age of ten. He is the First Rana to assume the title of Maharana 

  • Maharana Jawan Singh 1828 - 1838 CE

    The demoralisation of Mewar was complete, her fields were deluged with blood and her soil was prey of every paltry marauder." Such is the condition of Mewar into which the British arrive in 1817, bearing with them the Treaty of Paramountcy : the promise of restoring all the hereditary territories and protecting the state from any future invasion. Maharana Bhim Singh welcomes Capt. James Tod(later to become Col Tod), the first Political Agent, who reorganises the state of Mewar and its impoverished economy. Col Tod facilitates the turnaround of Mewar's fortunes and provides a new platform for stability and growth.

  • Maharana Sardar Singh 1838 - 1842 CE

    Victorian stability provides the foundation for the restoration of the lost glory and dignity of the Sisodia dynasty. After the dark days of the Maratha marauders and the civil war, Udaipur is now on the long road to recovery.
    Maharana Sardar Singh, adopted from the Bagore branch of the family, is still caught up in the debts of the past. It is his younger brother, Maharana Swarup Singh who begins the painful journey to recovery. He remains firm on upholding Rajput traditions in the face of British instructions to reform. During the 1857 Mutiny, the Maharana shelters the British refugees on Jagmandir Island Palace and proves, once again, that loyalty and trust are core values being upheld by Kshatriya Kings.

  • Maharana Swarup Singh 1842 - 1861 CE

    Victorian stability provides the foundation for the restoration of the lost glory and dignity of the Sisodia dynasty. After the dark days of the Maratha marauders and the civil war, Udaipur is now on the long road to recovery.
    Maharana Sardar Singh, adopted from the Bagore branch of the family, is still caught up in the debts of the past. It is his younger brother, Maharana Swarup Singh who begins the painful journey to recovery. He remains firm on upholding Rajput traditions in the face of British instructions to reform. During the 1857 Mutiny, the Maharana shelters the British refugees on Jagmandir Island Palace and proves, once again, that loyalty and trust are core values being upheld by Kshatriya Kings.

  • Maharana Shambhu Singh 1861 - 1874 CE

    In Maharana Shambhu Singh's reign, modern reforms are initiated : roads and public utilities, criminal and civil courts, a revitalised police force is established. Education gets top priority from the Maharana who, though not formally educated himself, recognises its value. The first school for girls is built in 1866. Public service and developmental activities become important for the state of Mewar and the Diwans of Eklingji.

  • Maharana Sajjan Singh 1874 - 1884 CE

    The pace of reforms is accelerated by Maharana Sajjan Singh, a very progressive ruler. The High Court is established and new government departments are formed to improve the quality of life in the state of Mewar. Udaipur becomes the second city after Bombay to form a municipality. Plans are drawn up to de-silt the Lake Pichola and afforestation programmes are launched.

    In the study of the arts and history, Maharana Sajjan Singh proves to be a worthy descendant of Rana Kumbha. Learned men in his court, called the navratnas, are encouraged to study, discuss and write treatises on diverse philosophical, historical and literary subjects. Mewari poetry reaches its apex now. Literary and scholarly pursuits bear fruit : Kaviraja Shyamaldas authors Veer Vinod and becomes the curator of the newly-formed Sajjan Vani Vilas library. 

    It is a veritable renaissance under Maharana Sajjan Singh. In a short span of 10 years, the glory of the Sisodia Kings of Mewar is restored.

  • Maharana Fateh Singh 1884- 1930 CE

    Graciousness and humility, piety and a sense of pride. Maharana Fateh Singh, adopted from the Shivrati branch of the family, proves to be a visionary ruler. 

    Like a true Suryavanshi, he refuses to bow to the dictates of the British and completely overturns the secondary role which British paramountcy is imposing upon him. 

    His courteousness, his strength of character and his strong-willed decisions are made more profound as the Maharana lacks formal education. But he is steeped in traditions of Mewar's history. And his piety derives its strength from the Hindu scriptures. In the 45 years of his reign, Fateh Singh makes it clear to the British that he is not the Maharana by the grace of any Queen of England but by order of his own people and in the service of Lord Eklingji. 

    He devotes himself to developing educational institutes in Udaipur and across the state, encourages the introduction of railway lines from Udaipur, restores old mansions in Chittor and the palace at Kumbhalgarh, builds the The Durbar Hall (now called Fateh Prakash ) and completes the Shiv Niwas Palace as a guesthouse for visitors, extends the water resources of the city by constructing the Feteh Sagar Lake. 

    For a simple man hailing from a modest village, Maharana Fateh Singh indeed brings to life the glories of Mewar. He remains a fountainhead of inspiration as he fulfills the Kshatriya vows of honour, decency and hospitality in his long reign.

  • Maharana Bhupal Singh 1930 - 1955 CE

    With a vision to lead in an age of turbulence. Maharana Bhupal Singh as the ruler of Mewar guides its destiny through India's most momentous period, the Independence from British Imperial rule. 

    Like Rana Pratap's heroic defence against the Mughals, Maharana Bhupal Singh's vision is born out of a deep sense of patriotism and pride in upholding the core values of Suryavanshi Kings. Confined to a wheelchair with a crippling spinal disorder, the Maharana's personal courage at all times exemplifies the triumph of the human spirit. 

    He is aware of the dynamic social changes sweeping across the country and encourages the orderly growth of social and political movements. Like his famous ancestors who were relentless reformers in the field of education, the Maharana establishes the Rana Pratap Hindi University at Chittor and an Agricultural College at Udaipur. Schools, specially for girls, are set up. 

    He is a committed environmentalist, organising longterm afforestation programmes for the Aravalli Hills. Sustained industrial activity makes the Mewar economy more vibrant in his reign. 

    With Independence, comes Maharana Bhupal Singh's finest hour. The ruler, who stood to lose the entire governance of his kingdom, became the first State to merge with the Indian Union. His historic words, echo the glory of Rana Sangha and Rana Pratap : "Today is a day of which to be greatly proud. India is independent. It brings to fulfillment the 1400 years' struggle and endeavour of my forefathers. It becomes my holy duty, on behalf of my ancestors, to hand over to the leaders of free India, this cherished and sacred Flame of Freedom to the country as a whole." 

    Maharana Bhupal Singh, acting honourably as the Diwan of Eklingji, serves the interests and welfare of his people even though it spells the end of Mewar's sovereignty which begins with Guhaditya and is proudly defended for 1500 years. The grateful government of India nominates him as "Maharaj Pramukh", the only one of its kind in whole of India

  • Maharana Bhagwat Singh Mewar 1955 - 1984 CE

    New challenges of a new age 
    Bhagwat Singh, a great-nephew of Maharana Fateh Singh, is adopted from the Shivrati branch of the family, and is witness to the epochal changes in independent India. Leading an ordinary life before he is adopted as son and heir to Maharana Bhupal Singh, Bhagwat Singh measures up to the extraordinary circumstances and demonstrates his determination to respect the legacy of Bapa Rawal. 

    Maharana Bhagwat Singh is one of the first rulers to realise the potential of 'adapting' palaces and forts into luxury hotels. The Lake Palace Hotel becomes a hugely successful venture, firmly putting Udaipur on the world tourism map. His corporate endeavours stand the House of Mewar in good stead when the Indian Government deals a terrible blow : In 1969, the Privy Purse is abolished, the rulers are stripped of their titles and privileges. Maharana Bhagwat Singh, now Mr Bhagwat Singh Mewar, makes a dignified appeal to Mrs Indira Gandhi, writing "it shall be an honour for me to be of service to the country, save only that I cannot accept to be instrumental in derogation of the institution to which I belong." 
    The focus is on social welfare : The Maharana Mewar Foundation is formed. Education and community welfare projects are initiated. Annual awards are instituted to reward services rendered to society. 

    In his Will and Testament of 1984, Bhagwat Singh recreates the Institution of the Maharana, ensuring the name of Maharana will continue in perpetuity. His eldest son, Mahendra Singh, voluntarily disinherited himself from the family. The custodianship of the House of Mewar passes on to the younger son, Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur. 
    The timeless legacy of Bapa Rawal is thus protected. And the Diwans of Eklingji continue their service through the 20th century. 

    Maharana Bhagwat Singh, on the invitation of Prime Minister Nehru, visits New Delhi : fulfilling the vows of his forefathers never to enter the capital-city so long as it is under foreign rule.

  • Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur 1984 CE

    "I believe in the past, but my feet are firmly rooted in the present and I'm constantly thinking about the future." 

    With these profound words, Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur, the younger son of Maharana Bhagwat Singh, is spearheading the process of modernisation initiated by his illustrious father.

    Shriji, as Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur is reverentially known as, is upholding the honourable values of Kshatriya kingship in an age when there are no kings. His empire today is a corporate one : developing palace-resorts and hotels, promoting of Polo and accelerating the pace of ongoing philanthropic activities. 

    The guiding principles of Bapa Rawal -- self-reliance, self-respect and the dignity of Man -- are as relevant for him today as they were to his forefathers. "Change rarely invalidates the past and it does not necessarily imply a rejection of the old. A great deal can - and should be - preserved from the past. In particular we should treasure the ancient and selfless values that have stood the test of time," says Shriji, the present custodian of the House of Mewar and the 76th Diwan of Eklingji. 

    Shriji has been preserving a vibrant cultural heritage enshrined in The City Palace, Udaipur in Rajasthan. As the Chairman and Managing Trustee of the Maharana Mewar Charitable Foundation (MMCF), Udaipur, Shriji is managing a spectrum of philanthropic and charitable activities emanating from the City Palace in Udaipur. Several non profit and commercial organisations are seamlessly networked to exemplify ‘Eternal Mewar’ for global and Indian audiences. The Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation, Vidyadan Trust, Maharana Mewar Historical Publications Trust, and Rajmata Gulab Kunwar Charitable Trust have emerged as the public charitable trusts responsible for more than 50 developmental projects in and around Udaipur. The City Palace Museum, Maharana Mewar Special Library, Maharana Mewar Research Institute, the publications division and educational institutes are some of the key projects being managed and developed by the Trusts. 

    HRH Group of Hotels, Udaipur, is the flagship commercial venture of the House of Mewar. HRH Group of Hotels is India’s largest and only chain of heritage palace-hotels and resorts under private ownership. Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur is the Chairman and Managing Director of the HRH Group of Hotels that offers regal experiences in island-palaces, museums, galleries, car collections, and much more. 

    History and the blessings of Eklingji are with Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur as he works towards turning his vision into a reality, taking the House of Mewar into the new millennium.

  • There in the highest heaven

    Dwell and reign those Gods who bear in common

    The name of Adityas...

    They are inviolable, imperishable, eternal beings...

    Their essence is the celestial light.

    They are the eternal sustainers of this luminous life which exists behind all phenomena.

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    Guhaditya - Mahendra II
    157 - 163

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    Kalbhoj Bapa
    164

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    Kalbhoj Bapa - Salivahan
    164 - 175

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    Shakti Kumar - Run Singh
    176 - 189

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    Kshem Singh - Kshetra Singh
    190 - 200

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    Lakha - Sanga
    201 - 206

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    Kumbha
    203

  • image-1

    Sanga
    206

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    Meerabai
    Rana Sanga's Daughter-in-Law

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    Ratan Singh - Udai Singh
    207- 209

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    Pratap Singh - Amar Singh
    210 - 211

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    Karan Singh - Amar Singh II
    212 - 216

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    Sangram Singh
    217

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    Jagat Singh II - Javan Singh
    218 - 224

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    Sardar Singh - Sajjan Singh
    225 - 228

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    Fateh Singh
    229

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    Bhupal Singh
    230

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    Bhagwat Singh
    231

  • image-1

    Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur
    232

  • image-1

    Mr. Lakshyaraj Singh Mewar of Udaipur
    233

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