Lineage of Mewar

  • Aditya Narayan
    4050 B.C.E

    In the highest heaven, it is said dwelled and reigned those Gods who bore in common the name of Adityas... These Gods were inviolable, imperishable, eternal beings and their essence was the celestial light. They were considered to be the eternal sustainers of the luminous life, which existed behind all phenomena. Aditya Narayan was The supreme soul, and the self-existent Lord.He created the waters and deposited in them a seed, which eventually became a golden egg, in which He Himself was born as Brahma.

  • Brahma
    4025 B.C.E.

    From the Golden Egg Aditya Narayan emerged as Brahma who was and is still considered the progenitor of all the worlds as per Hindu mythology.

  • Marichi
    4000 B.

    From Brahma descended Marichi, who was one of the seven great rishis. He was represented in the sky by the seven stars of the Great Bear, having bright crests.

  • Kashyap
    3975 B.C.E.

    Followed by Marichi was Kashyap who married Aditi and begot the Aditya’s and came into the geneological cycle.

  • Vivaswat = Aditya
    3925 B.C.E

    Kashyap on marrying Aditi also begot Vivaswat.

  • Manu
    3900 B.C.E

    Viwaswat was followed by his son Manu who was considered to be wise and mighty. Manu was revered as the lawgiver. His book The Manusmriti or the laws of Manu laid down the structures, which later become synonymous with Hinduism and the Hindu way of life.

  • Ikshvaku
    3850 B.C.E.

    Nabhag Dhrasth Prasu Shayati Narishyn  Ikshvaku was Manu’s son and it was from him, that the Suryavansh or the Sun Dynasty drew its origins. Ikshvaku is said to have reigned in Ayodhya at the beginning of the Treta or Second Yuga and according to various mythological scriptures is said to have a hundred sons.

  • Vikuk-kshi
    3825 B.C.E

    Nimi Dand Nabhagarist Kurush Kubadh With Nimi was founded the dynasty of Mithila in Videha. He was a great sage himself, who eventually abandoned his bodily form.

    The body of Nimi, it is believed was preserved from decay as if it were immortal.

    Nimi according tothe Vishnu Purana, resided in the eyes of all living creatures, in consequence of which was their eyelids were ever opening and shutting. This blinking and winking of the eyes thus came to be called nimisha.

  • Puranjaya or Kukutsya
    3800 B.C.E.

    Puranjaya was the City Conqueror. He destroyed all the enemies of the Gods and conquered the city of the daityas situated in the west. Indra assumed the form of a bull and carried Puranjaya upon his hump and as he rode on the hump, he obtained the name of Kukutstha or Kukutsya.

  • Anena = Vena
    3775 B.C.E.

    Anena, also called Vena, became the first King after Brahma and it was he who expounded the concept of Rajadharma or the law of government in which the notion of danda, authority backed by force, became important. But Vena ruled so unrighteously that the Gods ultimately had to slay him. After the death of Vena, the Gods held clouds of dust from bands of men who had taken to plundering because the country was left without a King in a state of choas. The sages rubbed the thigh of the dead king, from which emerged Nishad. It was from him that the Nishadas sprang out who came to be distinguished by their wicked deeds. The sages then rubbed the right hand from which sprang the majestic Prith who was resplendent in body and glowed like the manifested Agni.

  • Prithu 
    3750 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Vishvarandhi 
    3725 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Chandra 
    3700 B.C.E. 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Yuvnashva –I
    3675 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Shavast
    3650 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Brahiyep
    3625 B.C.E.. 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Kuvalyashva
    3600 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Drahdhasva
    3575 B.C.E. Chandrasva Kailasva Bhadrasva 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Haryashwa 
    3550 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Nikumbh
    3525 B.C.E

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Brahmanashava
    3500 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Kushava 
    3475 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Senjit 
    3425 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Yuvnashava II
    3400 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Mandhata
    3375 B.C.E.

    The son of Mandhata, Purukutsa was a celebrated warrior-King who reigned on the banks of the Narmada. Vishnu entered into his person for the purpose of destroying subterranean evil forces. The Vishnu Purana was revealed to Purukutsa, narrated to him by venerable sages.

  • Purukutsa

    3325 B.C.E          

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Tresdasyu
    3275 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Anranya
    3175 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Harshsasva
    3125 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Arun or Vasuman 
    3050 B.C.E.

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Tridhanva
    3025 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Satyavrat
    3000 B.C.E.

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Harishchandra
    2950 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Rohtashva
    2925 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Haritashva
    2900 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Champ or Champu
    2875 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Sudev 
    2850 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Vijai
    2800 B.C.E

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Bharook 
    2775 B.C.E

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Sangar
    2750 B.C.E

    King Sangar of Ayodhya and his descendants symbolised virtue, strength and the power of meditation and prayer. The valiant King Sangar (also referred to as King Sagar) is said to have performed the Ashwamedha sacrifice to appease the Gods.

    In Valmiki’s Ramayana, the dramatic story of the King’s ensuing plight and dishonour was narrated. He died a disconsolate King who was immersed in sorrow as he grieved over the loss of his sons. King Sagar’s wife Sumati is said to have given birth to 60,000 children, who created the seas. Another of his wives, Koshini gave birth to another son called Asmanjas(Check Spelling) whose sons formed the genealogical tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprahasti, page 7)

  • Anshuman
    2700 B.C.E.

    King Sangar of Ayodhya and his descendants symbolised virtue, strength and the power of meditation and prayer. The valiant King Sangar (also referred to as King Sagar) is said to have performed the Ashwamedha sacrifice to appease the Gods.

    In Valmiki’s Ramayana, the dramatic story of the King’s ensuing plight and dishonour was narrated. He died a disconsolate King who was immersed in sorrow as he grieved over the loss of his sons. King Sagar’s wife Sumati is said to have given birth to 60,000 children, who created the seas. Another of his wives, Koshini gave birth to another son called Asmanjas(Check Spelling) whose sons formed the genealogical tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprahasti, page 7)

  • Dileep 
    2675 B.C.E

    King Sangar of Ayodhya and his descendants symbolised virtue, strength and the power of meditation and prayer. The valiant King Sangar (also referred to as King Sagar) is said to have performed the Ashwamedha sacrifice to appease the Gods.

    In Valmiki’s Ramayana, the dramatic story of the King’s ensuing plight and dishonour was narrated. He died a disconsolate King who was immersed in sorrow as he grieved over the loss of his sons. King Sagar’s wife Sumati is said to have given birth to 60,000 children, who created the seas. Another of his wives, Koshini gave birth to another son called Asmanjas(Check Spelling) whose sons formed the genealogical tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprahasti, page 7)

  • Bhagirath
    2650 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Shrut 
    2625 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Nabh 
    2600 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sindhudeep 
    2550 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Ayutayu 
    2525 B.C.E.

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Ritupern 
    2500 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sarvkam 
    2475 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Saudas 
    2450 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Mitrasah 
    2425 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Ashmak 
    2400 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Dashrath-I 
    2325 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Vratsharma 
    2275 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Vishvashah 
    2250 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Khatvang 
    2225 B.C.E.

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Deeghbahoo 
    2200 B.C.E.

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Raghu 
    2175 B.C.E

    “As long as the mountains stand and the rivers flow so long shall the Ramayana be cherished among men and save them from sin.” With these prophetic words, Brahma revealed the Ramayana to Valmiki, who in turn composed the epic devoted to Raghu-kul.

  • Auj 
    2150 B.C.E

    “As long as the mountains stand and the rivers flow so long shall the Ramayana be cherished among men and save them from sin.” With these prophetic words, Brahma revealed the Ramayana to Valmiki, who in turn composed the epic devoted to Raghu-kul.

  • Dashrath- II 
    2125 B.C.E.

    King Dashraths wife Kaushalya gave birth to Ram, whereas Kayki gave birth to Bharat and Sumitra to Laxman and Shatrughan. (Rajprashasti, page 7)

  • Ram
    2100 B.C.E
    Lakshman (Angad & Chandraketu) Bharat (Taksh & Pushkal) Shatrughan (Subahu & Shatrughati)

    Ram, was an avatar of Vishnu and remained the highest in virtue and wisdom. The epic Ramayana is an epic, which celebrated his life. He was born to King Dashrath-II in Ayodhya in the state of Kosala. An introductory verse in the epic says, “He who reads and repeats this holy life-giving Ramayana is liberated from all his sins and exalted with all his posterity to the highest heaven.” 

    Ram’s graceful frame and virile beauty, his strength and courage, the purity of his heart, his compassion and deep wisdom and his statesmanship made him the ideal Kshatriya King. 

    With his wife, Sita, Ram was the embodiment of purity, tenderness and conjugal affection.

    With his brothers - Lakshman, Bharat and Shatrughan, he exemplified respect and trust within the family. 

    With his enemies, Ram was the personification of the powerful Kshatriya King, who adhered to dharma and did not cower before evil. 

    He was thus revered as Maryada Purshottam, one who was the upholder of the finest traditions of Mankind. Ram manifested the establishment of Hindu dharma in society and polity. This was known as Ram-Rajya, the epitome of the monarchical state. 

    Ram’s greatest virtue was in upholding the duties of the King even as he experienced hardships, sorrow and conflicts of life on earth. His triumph over the forces of evil, personified by Ravana of Lanka, was the hope for the world. 

    The kingdom of Kosala reached its zenith in the reign of Ram.

    Ram and Sita gave birth to Kush and Luv

  • Kush 
    2075 B.C.E Lav

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Kush 
    2075 B.C.E Lav

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Atithi 
    2050 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Nisadh 
    2025 B.C.E E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Nal 
    2000 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Nabh 
    1975 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Pundreek 
    1950 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Sudhnva 
    1925 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Devaneek 
    1900 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Aneeh 
    1875 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Devaneek 
    1900 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Aneeh 
    1875 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Pariyatra 
    1850 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Bal 
    1825 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Stahal 
    1800 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Vajranabh 
    1750 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Khagan 
    1725 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

 

  • Vishvash or Vidhyuti
    1675 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Hiranyanabh 
    1650 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Pushya 
    1625 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Dhruvsandhi 
    1600 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sudarshan 
    1575 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Agnivarna 
    1550 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sheeghrag

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Maru 
    1525 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Prasushrut 
    1500 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Susandhi 
    1475 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Amarshan 
    1450 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Mahswan 
    1425 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Vishwabahu

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Takshak

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Brahadbal 
    1375 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Brahdran 
    1350 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Arukhya 
    1325 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Vatsavyuh 
    1275 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Pratiyoum 
    1250 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Bhanu

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Divakar 
    1225 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Sahdev 
    1200 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Vrah-Dashva 
    1175 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Bhanuman 
    1150 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Pratikanshva 
    1125 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Su-Prateek 
    1100 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Maru-Dev 
    1075 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Su-Nakshtra 
    1050 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Pushkar 
    1025 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Antriksh 
    1000 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Sukhed 
    975 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Abhitrajit 
    950 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Brah-dhwaj 
    900 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Barhee 
    850 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Kratyanjay 
    800 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Rananjay 
    700 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Sanjay 
    650 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Shakay 
    600 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Shudhyod or Gautam Buddha
    575 B.C.E

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Langal 
    525 B.C.E

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Prasenjeet II 
    500 B.C.E.

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Khsurduck 
    475 B.C.E

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Mulak Ranak 
    450 B.C.E.

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Surath 
    425 B.C.E.

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Sumitra
    400 B.C.E.
    Vishvaraj Karma Vajranabh
    375 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Brajnabh 
    350 B.C.E
    King Bala 
    325 B.C.E

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Jeetshatru-sen 
    250 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Maha-sen 
    200 B.C.E

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Hans-sen 
    175 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Chandra-sen 
    125 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Sudham-sen 
    75 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Suhil-sen 
    25 B.C.E

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Vikram-sen 
    25 C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Maharathi 
    50 C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Atishayee

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Anchalsen 
    100 C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Kanaksen
    125 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Saubhil

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Mahasen II 
    150 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Vijaisen

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Ajaisen 
    175 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Abhangsen

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Mahabhayasen 
    200 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sinhrai 
    225 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sidhrath

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sujaditya 
    250 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sumukhaditya 
    275 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dharpat-sen 
    300 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sudantsen 
    325 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Vijaibhoop 
    350 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Somdutt 
    375 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Vijaisen 
    400 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dharsen 
    425 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dronsen 
    450 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dhravsen 
    475 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dharpat 
    500 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Grahsen 
    525 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • There in the highest heaven

    Dwell and reign those Gods who bear in common

    The name of Adityas...

    They are inviolable, imperishable, eternal beings...

    Their essence is the celestial light.

    They are the eternal sustainers of this luminous life which exists behind all phenomena.

  • image-1

    Aditya Narayan - Ishvaku
    1 - 7

  • image-1

    Vikuk-kshi - Mandhata
    8 - 25

  • image-1

    Prithu
    11

  • image-1

    Purukutsa - Asit
    26 - 41

  • image-1

    Sangar - Deeghbahoo
    42 - 60

  • image-1

    Raghu - Vidhyuti
    61 - 79

  • image-1

    Ram
    64

  • image-1

    Hiranyanabh - Vrah-Dashva
    80 - 102

  • image-1

    Bhanuman - Prasenjeet - II
    103 - 120

  • image-1

    Khsurduck - Mahabhayasen
    121 - 142

  • image-1

    Sinhrai - Grahsen
    143 - 156

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