MEWAR ENCYCLOPEDIA

Foreword
Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar

The lineage of Mewar traces the origin of the Mewar Dynasty from Surya (The Sun God). As one of the oldest serving dynasties, it traces its roots to Guhil (Guhaditya) in A.D. ca.569. Historically speaking the ancestry of the House of Mewar originates from the great warrior, Bappa Rawal, who was entrusted with the right to administer and function as Trustee of the State of Mewar by his Guru, Harit Rashi in 734 CE. The centuries, which passed from then on, have seen many turbulent years of defensive struggle in the battlefield to protect the honour os the State of Mewar by successive rulers.

I must compliment Mr. Ian Austin and Thakur Nahar Singh Jasol on their courage to undertake the enormous task of putting together the facts and figures on this long and most cherished history of the House of Mewar. The Mewar Encyclopedia is indeed the most authentic information finder on the history of the Mewar Dynasty.

Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur
Udaipur, January 2001

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Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar

Coat of Arms

Heralds, Insignias, Coats of Arms

The East India Company

In the glory days of colonization around the beginning of the 19th century, the British vied with other European powers - Portuguese, Dutch, French, Spanish and the Belgian for dominance in the provinces in India. The European powers fought each other and many alliances were born. Provincial Hindu Maharajas and Muslim Nawabs, in trying to break free from the Mughal Empire, forged alliances with any European power willing to help. Diplomacy, intrigue and treachery was the order of the day. The British, having gained naval supremacy during this period and with astute court craft, emerged the winners in India.

Lineage of Mewar

  • Aditya Narayan
    4050 B.C.E

    In the highest heaven, it is said dwelled and reigned those Gods who bore in common the name of Adityas... These Gods were inviolable, imperishable, eternal beings and their essence was the celestial light. They were considered to be the eternal sustainers of the luminous life, which existed behind all phenomena. Aditya Narayan was The supreme soul, and the self-existent Lord.He created the waters and deposited in them a seed, which eventually became a golden egg, in which He Himself was born as Brahma.

  • Brahma
    4025 B.C.E.

    From the Golden Egg Aditya Narayan emerged as Brahma who was and is still considered the progenitor of all the worlds as per Hindu mythology.

  • Marichi
    4000 B.

    From Brahma descended Marichi, who was one of the seven great rishis. He was represented in the sky by the seven stars of the Great Bear, having bright crests.

  • Kashyap
    3975 B.C.E.

    Followed by Marichi was Kashyap who married Aditi and begot the Aditya’s and came into the geneological cycle.

  • Vivaswat = Aditya
    3925 B.C.E

    Kashyap on marrying Aditi also begot Vivaswat.

  • Manu
    3900 B.C.E

    Viwaswat was followed by his son Manu who was considered to be wise and mighty. Manu was revered as the lawgiver. His book The Manusmriti or the laws of Manu laid down the structures, which later become synonymous with Hinduism and the Hindu way of life.

  • Ikshvaku
    3850 B.C.E.

    Nabhag Dhrasth Prasu Shayati Narishyn  Ikshvaku was Manu’s son and it was from him, that the Suryavansh or the Sun Dynasty drew its origins. Ikshvaku is said to have reigned in Ayodhya at the beginning of the Treta or Second Yuga and according to various mythological scriptures is said to have a hundred sons.

  • Vikuk-kshi
    3825 B.C.E

    Nimi Dand Nabhagarist Kurush Kubadh With Nimi was founded the dynasty of Mithila in Videha. He was a great sage himself, who eventually abandoned his bodily form.

    The body of Nimi, it is believed was preserved from decay as if it were immortal.

    Nimi according tothe Vishnu Purana, resided in the eyes of all living creatures, in consequence of which was their eyelids were ever opening and shutting. This blinking and winking of the eyes thus came to be called nimisha.

  • Puranjaya or Kukutsya
    3800 B.C.E.

    Puranjaya was the City Conqueror. He destroyed all the enemies of the Gods and conquered the city of the daityas situated in the west. Indra assumed the form of a bull and carried Puranjaya upon his hump and as he rode on the hump, he obtained the name of Kukutstha or Kukutsya.

  • Anena = Vena
    3775 B.C.E.

    Anena, also called Vena, became the first King after Brahma and it was he who expounded the concept of Rajadharma or the law of government in which the notion of danda, authority backed by force, became important. But Vena ruled so unrighteously that the Gods ultimately had to slay him. After the death of Vena, the Gods held clouds of dust from bands of men who had taken to plundering because the country was left without a King in a state of choas. The sages rubbed the thigh of the dead king, from which emerged Nishad. It was from him that the Nishadas sprang out who came to be distinguished by their wicked deeds. The sages then rubbed the right hand from which sprang the majestic Prith who was resplendent in body and glowed like the manifested Agni.

  • Prithu 
    3750 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Vishvarandhi 
    3725 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Chandra 
    3700 B.C.E. 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Yuvnashva –I
    3675 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Shavast
    3650 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Brahiyep
    3625 B.C.E.. 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Kuvalyashva
    3600 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Drahdhasva
    3575 B.C.E. Chandrasva Kailasva Bhadrasva 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Haryashwa 
    3550 B.C.E 

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Nikumbh
    3525 B.C.E

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Brahmanashava
    3500 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Kushava 
    3475 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Senjit 
    3425 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Yuvnashava II
    3400 B.C.E.

    Prithu was the first righteous ruler. He was the nourisher, who provided grain and food for the people and enabled them to domesticate animals. He pursued and milked the cow Viraj and received the milk into his own hands for the benefit of Mankind.Then followed all kinds of corn and vegetables upon which people subsisted till perpetuity.

    He was married to Arci and he invented various types of crops on earth as also the jewels hidden in earth. He was the one who develpoed agriculture like never before and made the earth prosperous and magnificnet for the welfare of his subjects. As a result the earth came to be known as Kanya of Prithu and named after him as Prithvi or Prithivi.

    By granting life to earth, Prithu came to be considered as her father and so the earth derived its name, Prithvi. 

    Prithu consolidated his domains and protected his subjects who were so pleased with him that they began calling him Raja. His rule was characterised by utopian conditions wherein the Raja ensured that the earth gave to each person whatever they required, the cows gave milk, the trees bore luscious fruit and men were free from fear, old age, disease and calamities. 

    Vishnu later entered the body of Prithu and as the Vishnu Purana states, consecrated him as the Raja.

    The Raja was now graced with divinity as he assumed the role of the Protector and the Provider for his people. Prithu thus embodied the values of kingship, which remained relevant across the Yugas.

    From the Nilamata Purana: seeing the image erected formerly in Magadha by Prtihu, son of Venu- a man obtains the merit of performing or Pundarika.

  • Mandhata
    3375 B.C.E.

    The son of Mandhata, Purukutsa was a celebrated warrior-King who reigned on the banks of the Narmada. Vishnu entered into his person for the purpose of destroying subterranean evil forces. The Vishnu Purana was revealed to Purukutsa, narrated to him by venerable sages.

  • Purukutsa

    3325 B.C.E          

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Tresdasyu
    3275 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Anranya
    3175 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Harshsasva
    3125 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Arun or Vasuman 
    3050 B.C.E.

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Tridhanva
    3025 B.C.E

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Satyavrat
    3000 B.C.E.

    Purukutsa ‘s son Tresdasyu was a royal sage and the author of many hymns. He was renowned for his wisdom and generosity.

  • Harishchandra
    2950 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Rohtashva
    2925 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Haritashva
    2900 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Champ or Champu
    2875 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Sudev 
    2850 B.C.E.

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Vijai
    2800 B.C.E

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Bharook 
    2775 B.C.E

    Among all the Suryavanshi Kings, the most revered was Harishchandra, the defender of the distressed, exemplified piety and sacrifice, honour and a sense of justice. In Puranic literature and the epics, Harishchandra is hailed as Bhartendu, the one who embodied the hopes and aspirations of Bharat-varsha. Though reduced to a state of utter helplessness by the sage Viswamitra, Harishchandra never lost his piety, faith or his honour. He was a Suryavanshi King remembered for being ‘bound, beaten, confused and afflicted’. Yet he remained conscious to the call of duty and service. His dharma remained steadfast even though his world fell apart. Vyasa’s Mahabharata relates that he was raised to the heaven of Indra for his performance of the Rajasuya sacrifice and for his unbounded charity.

  • Sangar
    2750 B.C.E

    King Sangar of Ayodhya and his descendants symbolised virtue, strength and the power of meditation and prayer. The valiant King Sangar (also referred to as King Sagar) is said to have performed the Ashwamedha sacrifice to appease the Gods.

    In Valmiki’s Ramayana, the dramatic story of the King’s ensuing plight and dishonour was narrated. He died a disconsolate King who was immersed in sorrow as he grieved over the loss of his sons. King Sagar’s wife Sumati is said to have given birth to 60,000 children, who created the seas. Another of his wives, Koshini gave birth to another son called Asmanjas(Check Spelling) whose sons formed the genealogical tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprahasti, page 7)

  • Anshuman
    2700 B.C.E.

    King Sangar of Ayodhya and his descendants symbolised virtue, strength and the power of meditation and prayer. The valiant King Sangar (also referred to as King Sagar) is said to have performed the Ashwamedha sacrifice to appease the Gods.

    In Valmiki’s Ramayana, the dramatic story of the King’s ensuing plight and dishonour was narrated. He died a disconsolate King who was immersed in sorrow as he grieved over the loss of his sons. King Sagar’s wife Sumati is said to have given birth to 60,000 children, who created the seas. Another of his wives, Koshini gave birth to another son called Asmanjas(Check Spelling) whose sons formed the genealogical tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprahasti, page 7)

  • Dileep 
    2675 B.C.E

    King Sangar of Ayodhya and his descendants symbolised virtue, strength and the power of meditation and prayer. The valiant King Sangar (also referred to as King Sagar) is said to have performed the Ashwamedha sacrifice to appease the Gods.

    In Valmiki’s Ramayana, the dramatic story of the King’s ensuing plight and dishonour was narrated. He died a disconsolate King who was immersed in sorrow as he grieved over the loss of his sons. King Sagar’s wife Sumati is said to have given birth to 60,000 children, who created the seas. Another of his wives, Koshini gave birth to another son called Asmanjas(Check Spelling) whose sons formed the genealogical tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprahasti, page 7)

  • Bhagirath
    2650 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Shrut 
    2625 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Nabh 
    2600 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sindhudeep 
    2550 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Ayutayu 
    2525 B.C.E.

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Ritupern 
    2500 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sarvkam 
    2475 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Saudas 
    2450 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Mitrasah 
    2425 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Ashmak 
    2400 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Dashrath-I 
    2325 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Vratsharma 
    2275 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Vishvashah 
    2250 B.C.E

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Khatvang 
    2225 B.C.E.

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Deeghbahoo 
    2200 B.C.E.

    It is said that redemption to the family’s honour came with Bhagirath whose devotion brought down from the heavens the holy Ganga, which flowed from the toe of Vishnu. With the holy waters, Bhagirath performed the rites for his ancestors and secured for them their entry into heaven. Ganga was also known as Bhagirathi, a testimony to Bhagirath’s pious perseverance.

    In the Ramayana and Mahabharata, and in puranic literature, innumerable stories talk about the warrior-Kings of Ayodhya who were upholders of dharma. But when they strayed from the path of righteousness, they had to pay the price for it, as the law of Karma did not allow any distinction. The dilemmas of dharma, the dangers of adharma, the need for perpetual vigilance to avoid sinful conduct were the eternal moral codes of Hinduism epitomised in the lives of these illustrious Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Raghu 
    2175 B.C.E

    “As long as the mountains stand and the rivers flow so long shall the Ramayana be cherished among men and save them from sin.” With these prophetic words, Brahma revealed the Ramayana to Valmiki, who in turn composed the epic devoted to Raghu-kul.

  • Auj 
    2150 B.C.E

    “As long as the mountains stand and the rivers flow so long shall the Ramayana be cherished among men and save them from sin.” With these prophetic words, Brahma revealed the Ramayana to Valmiki, who in turn composed the epic devoted to Raghu-kul.

  • Dashrath- II 
    2125 B.C.E.

    King Dashraths wife Kaushalya gave birth to Ram, whereas Kayki gave birth to Bharat and Sumitra to Laxman and Shatrughan. (Rajprashasti, page 7)

  • Ram
    2100 B.C.E
    Lakshman (Angad & Chandraketu) Bharat (Taksh & Pushkal) Shatrughan (Subahu & Shatrughati)

    Ram, was an avatar of Vishnu and remained the highest in virtue and wisdom. The epic Ramayana is an epic, which celebrated his life. He was born to King Dashrath-II in Ayodhya in the state of Kosala. An introductory verse in the epic says, “He who reads and repeats this holy life-giving Ramayana is liberated from all his sins and exalted with all his posterity to the highest heaven.” 

    Ram’s graceful frame and virile beauty, his strength and courage, the purity of his heart, his compassion and deep wisdom and his statesmanship made him the ideal Kshatriya King. 

    With his wife, Sita, Ram was the embodiment of purity, tenderness and conjugal affection.

    With his brothers - Lakshman, Bharat and Shatrughan, he exemplified respect and trust within the family. 

    With his enemies, Ram was the personification of the powerful Kshatriya King, who adhered to dharma and did not cower before evil. 

    He was thus revered as Maryada Purshottam, one who was the upholder of the finest traditions of Mankind. Ram manifested the establishment of Hindu dharma in society and polity. This was known as Ram-Rajya, the epitome of the monarchical state. 

    Ram’s greatest virtue was in upholding the duties of the King even as he experienced hardships, sorrow and conflicts of life on earth. His triumph over the forces of evil, personified by Ravana of Lanka, was the hope for the world. 

    The kingdom of Kosala reached its zenith in the reign of Ram.

    Ram and Sita gave birth to Kush and Luv

  • Kush 
    2075 B.C.E Lav

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Kush 
    2075 B.C.E Lav

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Atithi 
    2050 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Nisadh 
    2025 B.C.E E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Nal 
    2000 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Nabh 
    1975 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Pundreek 
    1950 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Sudhnva 
    1925 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Devaneek 
    1900 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Aneeh 
    1875 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Devaneek 
    1900 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Aneeh 
    1875 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Pariyatra 
    1850 B.C.E.

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Bal 
    1825 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Stahal 
    1800 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Vajranabh 
    1750 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

  • Khagan 
    1725 B.C.E

    In Veer Vinod, the great poet Shymaldas, traced the lineage of the Guhilots of Mewar from Kush, the elder of the twins. 

    Kush and Lav became kings of south and north Kosala. Kush builts Kusathali in the Vindhyas and Lav reigned at Shravasti.

    Kosala receded in importance after Ram’s departure. 

    Videha, Anga and Magadha in the east, Kekaya, Sindhu, Sauvira in the north, Saurashtra in the west and the Dakshinatya states gained in might and importance during this period.

    Kush and his wife gave birth to Athithi whose successors formed the geneological tree for the Mewar dynasty. (Rajprashasti, Page 7)

 

  • Vishvash or Vidhyuti
    1675 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Hiranyanabh 
    1650 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Pushya 
    1625 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Dhruvsandhi 
    1600 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sudarshan 
    1575 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Agnivarna 
    1550 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Sheeghrag

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Maru 
    1525 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Prasushrut 
    1500 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Susandhi 
    1475 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Amarshan 
    1450 B.C.E

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Mahswan 
    1425 B.C.E.

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Vishwabahu

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Takshak

    ‘Rashtra’ and righteousness became paramount as Aryan culture became the dominant force across the Gangetic plain. And Veer Vinod delved into the epic Mahabharata to focus on the lineage of the Suryavanshi Kings.

    In the epic battle fought in Kurukshetra, north of Delhi, between the Pandavas and Kauravas, all the major kingdoms and tribes of the sub-continent were pitched in battle against each other. The Kings of Madhyadesa and Kasi, Kosala, Magadha, Matsya, Chedi, and the Yadus of Mathura had allied with Pandavas; the allies of Kauravas comprised the King of Pragjyotish, the Kambojas, Yavanas, Sakas, Kaikeyas, Sindhus and Sauviras, Mahishmati and Avanti in Madhyadesa. 

    Mahabharata, the single longest poem of the world, enunciated the core values of Kshatriya kingship: Truthfulness and honour, valour and sacrifice for the kingdom, ethical code in peace and war, respect for the Guru or teacher, loyalty and gratitude. 

    Kshatriya Kings, across the ages, embodied these core values and traditions. Territorial integrity not acquisition remained foremost; common good not self-interest became the goal. The Rig-Vedic concept of ‘Rashtra-sutra’ came alive in the thoughts, words and deeds of the Suryavanshi Kings.

  • Brahadbal 
    1375 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Brahdran 
    1350 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Arukhya 
    1325 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Vatsavyuh 
    1275 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Pratiyoum 
    1250 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Bhanu

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Divakar 
    1225 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Sahdev 
    1200 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Vrah-Dashva 
    1175 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Bhanuman 
    1150 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Pratikanshva 
    1125 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Su-Prateek 
    1100 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Maru-Dev 
    1075 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Su-Nakshtra 
    1050 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Pushkar 
    1025 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Antriksh 
    1000 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Sukhed 
    975 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Abhitrajit 
    950 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Brah-dhwaj 
    900 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Barhee 
    850 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Kratyanjay 
    800 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Rananjay 
    700 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Sanjay 
    650 B.C.E.

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Shakay 
    600 B.C.E

    Veer Vinod mentioned the supreme sacrifice of Brahadbal on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

    The ascendancy of Magadha and the rise of the Shakyas was a testimony to the indomitable spirit of Kshatriya-Kings among whom; Bimbisara was one of the greatest. 

    Dynastic relations with King Prasenjit-II of Kosala helped Bimbisara expand the empire of Magadha.

    Under Ajatshatru, Magadha established the monarchical system across the Ganges plain.

    The divine nature of Kshatriya kingship was now firmly entrenched. Elaborate ritual sacrifices - the Rajasuya and the Ashwamedha were performed by the Kings to affirm their divinity and keep alive the Vedic traditions.

  • Shudhyod or Gautam Buddha
    575 B.C.E

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Langal 
    525 B.C.E

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Prasenjeet II 
    500 B.C.E.

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Khsurduck 
    475 B.C.E

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Mulak Ranak 
    450 B.C.E.

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Surath 
    425 B.C.E.

    To the Shakya King in Kapilavastu was born Shudhyodh or Gautam Buddha, a Prince among Princes. Abandoning his princely life, Buddha discovered the means of salvation through intense meditation. Once enlightened, he preached his first sermon, which was the Turning of the Wheel of Law at Sarnath near Banaras.

    He provided a simple meaning to human existence and its goal, opposing the brahmanical orthodoxy of his times. Buddhism emerged as an organised religion, in an age made prosperous and stable by the mighty Kshatriya kingdoms along the Gangetic plain. 

    In the Satapatha Brahmana, Buddha was pronounced as the ninth avatar of Vishnu, holding forth the promise of salvation and nirvana. It was an age of political uncertainty and social churning older kingdoms made way for the new. Migrations from Greece and Central Asia, new settlements in the north and west shifted the focus onto new kings, eras and people.

  • Sumitra
    400 B.C.E.
    Vishvaraj Karma Vajranabh
    375 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Brajnabh 
    350 B.C.E
    King Bala 
    325 B.C.E

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Jeetshatru-sen 
    250 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Maha-sen 
    200 B.C.E

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Hans-sen 
    175 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Chandra-sen 
    125 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Sudham-sen 
    75 B.C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Suhil-sen 
    25 B.C.E

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Vikram-sen 
    25 C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Maharathi 
    50 C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Atishayee

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Anchalsen 
    100 C.E.

    Sumitra, the last Suryavanshi King who reigned in Ayodhya, was a witness to changing political fortunes: the decline of Greek kingdoms in the northwest, the rise of the Scythians or the Shakas and their slow settlement in Kutch, Kathiawar and Malwa. Like the Suryavanshi Kings, these rulers became the builders of empires in Bharat-varsha. 

    Despite the prevalence of foreigners, Vedic religion and rituals remained sacrosant. Dharma and righteousness, enshrined in the Bhagavad-Gita, were popularised through Brahmanical teachings. The Gita emerged as a sacred text par excellence, precise and literary.

  • Kanaksen
    125 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Saubhil

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Mahasen II 
    150 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Vijaisen

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Ajaisen 
    175 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Abhangsen

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Mahabhayasen 
    200 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sinhrai 
    225 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sidhrath

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sujaditya 
    250 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sumukhaditya 
    275 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dharpat-sen 
    300 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Sudantsen 
    325 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Vijaibhoop 
    350 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Somdutt 
    375 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Vijaisen 
    400 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dharsen 
    425 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dronsen 
    450 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dhravsen 
    475 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Dharpat 
    500 C.E

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • Grahsen 
    525 C.E.

    It was Kanaksen who made history, as he was the first of the Suryavanshi Kings to migrate to Saurashtra and establish the empire of Vallabhi there. (Gazeeters-Erskine; 1992 (first published 1908), Page - 13) Col James Tod, in Volume I of Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, was uncertain “ by what route Keneksen found his way to Saurashtra. He wrested dominion from a prince of the Pramara race and founded Birnagara. Four generations afterwards, Vijaisen founded Vijyapoor at the head of the Saurashtra peninsula. Vidurba was also founded by him, but the most celebrated was the capital of Balabhipoora, now revealed as Balbhi near Bhownugger.” 

    The appellation ‘Sen’ (meaning ‘army’) remained the martial name for many generations, to be followed by ‘Dit’ or ‘Aditya’ (sun). New terrorities, new challenges presented themselves to the descendants of Kanaksen who established themselves in Saurashtra, the country of Sauras or Sun-worshippers. 

    The indomitable Kshatriya spirit of valour and honour was demonstrated in the battles for supremacy and imperial ambitions were kept alive. The rich heritage of Hindu values and traditions, emanating from the distinguished royal house of Raghu, were preserved and nurtured. Lost in the labyrinths of antiquity were the records that detailed the lives and achievements of these Kshatriya Kings who had the enduring courage to face hardships and calamities. 

    From the fires of destruction that reduced Vallabhipura to ashes emerged the dynasty, which continued to shape the destiny of Bharat-varsha. It heralded new hope for the future and provided continuity to the glorious lineage of Suryavanshi Kings who descended from Ikshvaku and Ram in Kosala.

  • There in the highest heaven

    Dwell and reign those Gods who bear in common

    The name of Adityas...

    They are inviolable, imperishable, eternal beings...

    Their essence is the celestial light.

    They are the eternal sustainers of this luminous life which exists behind all phenomena.

  • image-1

    Aditya Narayan - Ishvaku
    1 - 7

  • image-1

    Vikuk-kshi - Mandhata
    8 - 25

  • image-1

    Prithu
    11

  • image-1

    Purukutsa - Asit
    26 - 41

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    Sangar - Deeghbahoo
    42 - 60

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    Raghu - Vidhyuti
    61 - 79

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    Ram
    64

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    Hiranyanabh - Vrah-Dashva
    80 - 102

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    Bhanuman - Prasenjeet - II
    103 - 120

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    Khsurduck - Mahabhayasen
    121 - 142

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    Sinhrai - Grahsen
    143 - 156

Ancestry of the house of mewar

  • Guhaditya 566 A.D.

    A stirring tale of survival, a dramatic ordeal in the Aravalli hills where Guhil is born in a cave. His mother, Queen Pushpavati, finds refuge in the hills after the Vallabhipura sacking. She later consecrates herself in her funeral pyre. The young Guhil is raised by the daughter of a temple priest, and for friends, he has the hardy Bhils.

    With these mountain-men, Guhil forges strong bonds of brotherhood. The Bhil chieftain grants Guhil or Guhaditya his first territory, a stretch of forested mountain near Idar. The State of Mewar is founded and has never forgotten the contribution of the Bhils. Guhaditya's worthy descendants - upholding the Kshatriya principles of honour, gratitude, discipline, courage and pious humility - carry forth their founder's name and are known as The Guhilots of Mewar.

  • Bhoj 586 A.D.

    A stirring tale of survival, a dramatic ordeal in the Aravalli hills where Guhil is born in a cave. His mother, Queen Pushpavati, finds refuge in the hills after the Vallabhipura sacking. She later consecrates herself in her funeral pyre. The young Guhil is raised by the daughter of a temple priest, and for friends, he has the hardy Bhils.

    With these mountain-men, Guhil forges strong bonds of brotherhood. The Bhil chieftain grants Guhil or Guhaditya his first territory, a stretch of forested mountain near Idar. The State of Mewar is founded and has never forgotten the contribution of the Bhils. Guhaditya's worthy descendants - upholding the Kshatriya principles of honour, gratitude, discipline, courage and pious humility - carry forth their founder's name and are known as The Guhilots of Mewar.

  • Mahendra I 606 A.D.

    A stirring tale of survival, a dramatic ordeal in the Aravalli hills where Guhil is born in a cave. His mother, Queen Pushpavati, finds refuge in the hills after the Vallabhipura sacking. She later consecrates herself in her funeral pyre. The young Guhil is raised by the daughter of a temple priest, and for friends, he has the hardy Bhils.

    With these mountain-men, Guhil forges strong bonds of brotherhood. The Bhil chieftain grants Guhil or Guhaditya his first territory, a stretch of forested mountain near Idar. The State of Mewar is founded and has never forgotten the contribution of the Bhils. Guhaditya's worthy descendants - upholding the Kshatriya principles of honour, gratitude, discipline, courage and pious humility - carry forth their founder's name and are known as The Guhilots of Mewar.

  • Naag 626 A.D. - 646 A.D.

    Naag or Nagaditya builds the capital at Nagda, with beautifully sculpted temples commemorating the rise of the Suryavanshi Kings of Mewar.

  • Shiladitya 646 A.D. - 661 A.D.

    Naag or Nagaditya builds the capital at Nagda, with beautifully sculpted temples commemorating the rise of the Suryavanshi Kings of Mewar.

  • Aprajeet 661 A.D. - 688 A.D.

    Naag or Nagaditya builds the capital at Nagda, with beautifully sculpted temples commemorating the rise of the Suryavanshi Kings of Mewar.

  • Mahendra II 688 A.D. - 734 A.D.

    Naag or Nagaditya builds the capital at Nagda, with beautifully sculpted temples commemorating the rise of the Suryavanshi Kings of Mewar.

  • gahuditya-salivahan

    Bapa the Fountainhead
    Bapa, the fountainhead of piety and humility for the Guhilot Kings of Mewar, is the true founder of the dynasty's supremacy among Rajputs. 

    Bapa moves the capital of Mewar from Nagda to the mighty fortress city of Chittor. In the face of Muslim invasions across the western borders of Rajputana, Bapa unites the smaller states of Ajmer and Jaisalmer to repel the invaders.
    Bapa thus is setting the tradition of pious humility which has remained the hallmark of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar. He builds a temple dedicated to Eklingji, with an icon of granite as pure and clear as a diamond. 

    Bapa Rawal (his real name is Kalbhoj Bappa) follows the cardinal principles which Harit Rashi lays down for him as Dewan of Eklingji: respect for Mankind, service to the community and maintenance of ancient Vedic culture. 

    These precepts have never been forgotten and are the enduring, living heritage of the House of Mewar - the world's longest-serving dynasty.

  • Khuman 753 A.D.

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Mattut 773 A.D. - 793 A.D.

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Bhartri Bhatt I 793 A.D. - 813 A.D.

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Sinh 813 A.D. - 828 A.D.

    The Saga of the Mighty Warrior...
    When Chittor emerges as the guardian of Hindu faith, Khuman emerges as its most remarkable guardian-King. 

    In Khuman Rasa, one of the oldest poetic chronicles of Mewar, Khuman's defence of Chittor is celebrated by the bards. In the face of formidable aggression by Muslim invaders, Khuman brings together the Rajput Kings and other Chieftens to put up a united defence. 

    He successfully defends the 'crimson standard of Mewar' , treats with contempt the demand for tribute, and after a violent assault in which the barbarian is driven back, follows and discomfit

  • Khuman II 828 A.D. - 853 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Mahayuk 853 A.D. - 878 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Khuman III 878 A.D. - 942 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Bhartri Bhatt II 942 A.D. - 943 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Allat 951 A.D. - 953 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Narvahan 971 A.D. - 973 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Salivahan 973 A.D. - 977 A.D.

    Khuman II is engaged in twenty-four great battles against Muslim invaders. And the name of Khuman becomes a family distinction : Khuman Gaani : invoked even today as a greeting and a blessing. "Many Salutations to Khuman" 

    The impact of Khuman's valiant defence of Chittor, from Muslim invaders, is felt for over three hundred years. The state of Mewar proves to be invincible, repelling the aggressors, forcing them to find other routes into the heartland of the country. 

    A period of consolidation and growth dawns.
    The descendants of Khuman strengthen the territorial integrity of the state of Mewar. New estates and principalities are carved out by the Guhilot Kings. The power and prestige of Chittor is on the ascendant.

  • Shakti Kumar 977 A.D. - 993 A.D. Sadeventji (*Khergarh Marwar) Sejakji (*Bhavnagar) Ranaji Sarangji (*Lathi) Shahji (*Palitana) Doongarji Samarsinghji (* Rajpeepla) Bhavj Veesaji (*Bara Va

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Amba Prasad 993 A.D. - 1007 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Suchi Verma 1007 A.D. - 1021 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Narverma 1021 A.D. - 1035 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Kirti Verma 1035 A.D. - 1051 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Yograj 1051 A.D. - 1068 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Bairath 1068 A.D. - 1088 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Hanspal 1088 A.D. - 1103 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Vair Singh 1103 A.D. - 1107 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Vijai Singh 1107 A.D. - 1127 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Ari Singh 1127 A.D. - 1138 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  •   Chaudh Singh 1138 A.D. - 1148 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Vikram Singh 1148 A.D. - 1158 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Run Singh 1158 A.D. - 1168 A.D.

    The jagirs or estates of Khergarh Marwar, Bhavnagar, Lathi, Palitana, Rajpipla, Bara Vallabhipur are formed in the reign of Shakti Kumar.

    As the new estates pledge their undying loyalty to the Suryavanshi King in times of peace and war, a new social order is born out of this intense kinship. 

    The word of honour, the oath of loyalty and military obligations become more significant than ever before.

    War increasingly becomes a grand pageant and death on the battlefield is the highest possible honour. 

    The King, as the fountainhead of Kshatriya values, is keeping alive the eternal moral code emanating from the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata. 

    The Aitpur inscriptions and Jain manuscripts credit Shakti Kumar and his descendants with upholding the ideals and values cherished by Bapa Rawal and the founders of the dynasty of Guhilot Kings of Mewar.

  • Khshem Singh 1168 A.D. - 1172 A.D. Mahap

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Samant Singh 1172 A.D. - 1179 A.D.

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  •  Kumar Singh 1179 A.D. - 1191 A.D.

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  •  Manthan Singh  1191 A.D. - 1211 A.D.

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  •  Padam Singh 1211 A.D. - 1213 A.D.

    "Mewar…a wave of iron in the path of Delhi," eulogises Chund Bardai in Prithivirajraso, as Khshem Singh joins forces together with Prithiviraj Chouhan. Their common enemy is Muhammad Ghuri who is soundly defeated by the united Rajput forces in the First Battle of Tar'ain near Delhi. But in the Second Battle of Tar'ain, the "heroes of Delhi and Chittor are asleep on the banks of the Caggar in the wave of steel."

  • Jetra Singh 1213 A.D. - 1253 A.D.

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Tej Singh 1261 A.D. - 1267 A.D.

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Samar Singh 1273 A.D. - 1302 A.D. Ratan Singh Kumbhkran

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Rawal Ratan Singh 1303 A.D.

    Delhi of the Chouhans is captured: devastation, plunder and massacre commences. The Turki Sultans of Delhi attempt to subjugate the other Rajput states. Mewar - under Jetra Singh, Tej Singh and Samar Singh - continues to thwart the aggression of the Delhi Sultans.

    Till 1303, when Allaudin Khilji lays siege to the mighty fortress of Chittor. Legend has it that he covets Rani Padmini. In the face of utmost adversity, Rattan Singh is unwilling to surrender Chittor or Padmini. There is only one way out for the besieged but courageous Mewaris : the women, led by Rani Padmini, immolate themselves in a huge funeral pyre to find 'security from dishonour in the devouring element'; and the men march through the gates of Chittor for the final assault on the Sultan's army. Chittor is plundered and ravaged by Allaudin Khilji but the honour, pride and chivalry of the Guhilot Kings of Mewar remains unsullied... 

    Some of the family members were smuggled out of beseized Chittorgarh and sent to the safety of the Aravalli Hills .

  • Rana Hamir Singh 1326 A.D. - 1364 A.D.

    Rana Ajay Singh of Shishoda nominates his more meritorious nephew Hamir as his heir (destined to redeem the glory of Mewar)in preference to his son Sajjan Singh , who in turn shifts to Sattar(Chatrapati Shivaji's ancestor ) (Tod pg.216). Earlier Bapa Rawal also nominates his worthier younger son as heir in preference to less worthy elder son who in turn moves to Gujrat to start the line of Asil Gehlotes(Tod Pg. 197).

    In 1326, Hamir Singh regains Chittor and becomes the first ruler of Mewar to use the honorific 'Rana'. A period of relative peace and prosperity begins. 

    Rana Hamir Singh becomes a bridge to the past, adhering to the principles of trusteeship laid down by Bapa Rawal and restoring the glory of Vedic traditions. 

    The Guhilots of Mewar adopt the clan name of Sisodia. Rana Hamir Singh emerges as the 'sole Hindu prince of power now left in India : all the ancient dynasties being crushed.'

  • Rana Kshetra Singh 1364 A.D. - 1382 A.D. Verisal Khangra Loona

    Rana Ajay Singh of Shishoda nominates his more meritorious nephew Hamir as his heir (destined to redeem the glory of Mewar)in preference to his son Sajjan Singh , who in turn shifts to Sattar(Chatrapati Shivaji's ancestor ) (Tod pg.216). Earlier Bapa Rawal also nominates his worthier younger son as heir in preference to less worthy elder son who in turn moves to Gujrat to start the line of Asil Gehlotes(Tod Pg. 197).

    In 1326, Hamir Singh regains Chittor and becomes the first ruler of Mewar to use the honorific 'Rana'. A period of relative peace and prosperity begins. 

    Rana Hamir Singh becomes a bridge to the past, adhering to the principles of trusteeship laid down by Bapa Rawal and restoring the glory of Vedic traditions. 

    The Guhilots of Mewar adopt the clan name of Sisodia. Rana Hamir Singh emerges as the 'sole Hindu prince of power now left in India : all the ancient dynasties being crushed.'

  • Rana Lakha 1382 A.D. - 1421 A.D. Chunda (Chundawat) Ajaa (Sarangdevot)

    A golden age dawns for the Maharanas of Mewar. 
    Their triumph over adversity, their political will to consolidate the State and develop every aspect of Mewari culture, and the way they are moulding the character of Rajputs is awe-inspiring. The impact of their achievements is still visible, centuries later... 
     

  • Rana Mokal 1421 A.D. - 1433 A.D. Sakhra Salkha Bhawnsingh Bhakhat Gajsingh Loona Raghavdeo Dulha Bhanda


    Maharana Lakha proves to be a prolific builder of palaces and temples, a fine patron of the arts, and a developer of the recently-discovered silver and zinc mines. With Chonda, establishing the Chondawat clan, an important precedent is set : the mantle of Rana passes on to the younger son.

  • Rana Kumbha 1433 A.D. - 1468 A.D. Kheema Sua Satta Natha Adu Gadh

    Rana Kumbha provides a burst of creative energy and military might which makes Chittor the centre of medieval India. As a builder of forts, he is unparalleled; as a patron and promoter of the arts, he is a trend-setter; and as a military leader, he is supreme. 

    Rana Kumbha, hailed as one of the greatest military generals of the Sisodia Rajputs, is a ruler of varied talents. A man as intensely committed to literature and music as to the rigours of warfare. 

    Rana Kumbha reigns for over 30 years, from 1433 to 1468, and consolidates Mewar's independence as a Hindu kingdom. Like his illustrious predecessors, Rana Kumbha is a defender of Mewar's territories, not ready to accept the sway of the Delhi Sultans over Gujarat, Malwa and parts of Rajasthan. 
     

  • Rana Ooda 1468 A.D. - 1473 A.D.

    Mewar is invaded several times and successfully defended by Rana Kumbha. In 1437, Sultan Mahmud, King of Malwa, is taken prisoner after a pitched battle and Rana Kumbha demonstrates his magnanimity as a victor. Mahmud is treated as a guest and then released without demands for ransom. The hallmark of Mewari conduct in victory is established once again. 

    Rana Kumbha is a relentless builder: constructing no less than 32 of the 84 fortresses in Mewar. The monumental fort Kumbhalgarh, named after the Rana himself, is a majestic fort-city with 36 km-long stone walls encircling the hill. But it is in Chittor that Rana Kumbha's most impressive construction is seen: Vijay Sthambh built by Rana Khumba is the so called Victory Tower . The Jain Community built the Keerti Sthambh as a Tower of Prestige, as during Khumba's reign the Jain community also flourished due to peace and protection of the Rana. 

    Rana Kumbha's vast literary output - dramas in Sanskrit, books on varied subjects like genealogy, grammar, music compositions - underscore his multifaceted talents. 

    His erudition, his commitment to artistic excellence and his military might make Rana Kumbha one of the greatest personalities, not just of Mewar and Rajasthan, but of medieval India.

  • Rana Raimal 1473 A.D - 1509 A.D.

    Mewar is invaded several times and successfully defended by Rana Kumbha. In 1437, Sultan Mahmud, King of Malwa, is taken prisoner after a pitched battle and Rana Kumbha demonstrates his magnanimity as a victor. Mahmud is treated as a guest and then released without demands for ransom. The hallmark of Mewari conduct in victory is established once again. 

    Rana Kumbha is a relentless builder: constructing no less than 32 of the 84 fortresses in Mewar. The monumental fort Kumbhalgarh, named after the Rana himself, is a majestic fort-city with 36 km-long stone walls encircling the hill. But it is in Chittor that Rana Kumbha's most impressive construction is seen: Vijay Sthambh built by Rana Khumba is the so called Victory Tower . The Jain Community built the Keerti Sthambh as a Tower of Prestige, as during Khumba's reign the Jain community also flourished due to peace and protection of the Rana. 

    Rana Kumbha's vast literary output - dramas in Sanskrit, books on varied subjects like genealogy, grammar, music compositions - underscore his multifaceted talents. 

    His erudition, his commitment to artistic excellence and his military might make Rana Kumbha one of the greatest personalities, not just of Mewar and Rajasthan, but of medieval India.

  • Rana Sanga 1509 A.D. - 1527 A.D. Prithviraj Jaimal Jessa Kishna

    Mewar is invaded several times and successfully defended by Rana Kumbha. In 1437, Sultan Mahmud, King of Malwa, is taken prisoner after a pitched battle and Rana Kumbha demonstrates his magnanimity as a victor. Mahmud is treated as a guest and then released without demands for ransom. The hallmark of Mewari conduct in victory is established once again. 

    Rana Kumbha is a relentless builder: constructing no less than 32 of the 84 fortresses in Mewar. The monumental fort Kumbhalgarh, named after the Rana himself, is a majestic fort-city with 36 km-long stone walls encircling the hill. But it is in Chittor that Rana Kumbha's most impressive construction is seen: Vijay Sthambh built by Rana Khumba is the so called Victory Tower . The Jain Community built the Keerti Sthambh as a Tower of Prestige, as during Khumba's reign the Jain community also flourished due to peace and protection of the Rana. 

    Rana Kumbha's vast literary output - dramas in Sanskrit, books on varied subjects like genealogy, grammar, music compositions - underscore his multifaceted talents. 

    His erudition, his commitment to artistic excellence and his military might make Rana Kumbha one of the greatest personalities, not just of Mewar and Rajasthan, but of medieval India.

  • Rana Ratan Singh 1527 A.D. - 1531 A.D.

    Chittor, the most famous symbol of Rajput resistance, is targeted by Muslim invaders. Dogged by the vengeful Sultan of Gujarat, the descendants of the mighty Sanga find themselves besieged in 1535. 

    While a safe haven is found for the youngest son of Sanga, Udai Singh, Chittor witnesses the jauhar or self-immolation of 13,000 women led by the Rajmata Karnavati. Courage and honour in the face of utmost adversity is demonstrated yet again by the Sisodia Rajputs. 

  • Rana Vikramaditya 1531 A.D. - 1537 A.D.

    Chittor is in ruins, plundered and sacked by the Sultan's forces, but more threatening is the conflict within the Maharana's family. Udai Singh, the sole surviving direct descendant of Bapa Rawal, is saved by the heroic act of his foster-mother, Panna Dai. Among the heroes and legends of the Royal House of Mewar, the humble name of Panna Dai is revered for her selfless act of loyalty. 

    Saved by her, Udai Singh becomes the Maharana and founds the city of Udaipur on the shores of Lake Pichola in 1559. Guided by an ascetic's blessing, he builds the city and shifts the capital from Chittor. 

    Eight years later in 1567, Chittor is besieged by Akbar's army. It signals the end of Chittor, the seat of power which Bapa Rawal had chosen as the capital of Mewar. Over 30,000 inhabitants of the fort seek and find death in battle, adding yet another chapter in Mewar's glorious history of honourable resistance. 
    As Chittor is reduced to ruins, Udaipur becomes the centre of the Mewari world, a fabled city secured by valleys and lakes, not reliant on the old system of forts and ramparts.

  • Rana Vikramaditya 1531 A.D. - 1537 A.D.

    Chittor is in ruins, plundered and sacked by the Sultan's forces, but more threatening is the conflict within the Maharana's family. Udai Singh, the sole surviving direct descendant of Bapa Rawal, is saved by the heroic act of his foster-mother, Panna Dai. Among the heroes and legends of the Royal House of Mewar, the humble name of Panna Dai is revered for her selfless act of loyalty. 

    Saved by her, Udai Singh becomes the Maharana and founds the city of Udaipur on the shores of Lake Pichola in 1559. Guided by an ascetic's blessing, he builds the city and shifts the capital from Chittor. 

    Eight years later in 1567, Chittor is besieged by Akbar's army. It signals the end of Chittor, the seat of power which Bapa Rawal had chosen as the capital of Mewar. Over 30,000 inhabitants of the fort seek and find death in battle, adding yet another chapter in Mewar's glorious history of honourable resistance. 
    As Chittor is reduced to ruins, Udaipur becomes the centre of the Mewari world, a fabled city secured by valleys and lakes, not reliant on the old system of forts and ramparts.

  • Udai Singh 1537 A.D. - 1572 A.D.

    Chittor is in ruins, plundered and sacked by the Sultan's forces, but more threatening is the conflict within the Maharana's family. Udai Singh, the sole surviving direct descendant of Bapa Rawal, is saved by the heroic act of his foster-mother, Panna Dai. Among the heroes and legends of the Royal House of Mewar, the humble name of Panna Dai is revered for her selfless act of loyalty. 

    Saved by her, Udai Singh becomes the Maharana and founds the city of Udaipur on the shores of Lake Pichola in 1559. Guided by an ascetic's blessing, he builds the city and shifts the capital from Chittor. 

    Eight years later in 1567, Chittor is besieged by Akbar's army. It signals the end of Chittor, the seat of power which Bapa Rawal had chosen as the capital of Mewar. Over 30,000 inhabitants of the fort seek and find death in battle, adding yet another chapter in Mewar's glorious history of honourable resistance. 
    As Chittor is reduced to ruins, Udaipur becomes the centre of the Mewari world, a fabled city secured by valleys and lakes, not reliant on the old system of forts and ramparts.

  • Rana Pratap Singh 1572 A.D. - 1597 A.D. Naga Jagmal Kanha Jaitsingh Veeram Raisingh Sagar Amra Siha Panghan Surtan Loonkaran Machal Masesh Shaktisingh Jagraj Rudra

    Undaunted heroism, inflexible fortitude, pride, honour and perseverance: Rana Pratap exemplifies the noble values and traditions of the Suryavanshi Kings. 
    When he succeeds as the Rana, the state of Mewar is virtually without a capital, without resources, but it still is a tiny pool of resistance in the vast ocean of the Mughal Empire. Mewar is encircled by Akbar's allies: Marwar, Amber, Bikaner, Bundi acknowledge Mughal supremacy. Only Rana Pratap remains steadfast to his legendary vows that he would never offer obeisance to Delhi as long as it remained under foreign yolk nor even be summoned to Delhi. 

    The glory of Rana Pratap is inspiration for all times. 

    Though Chittor is sacked and plundered by Akbar's forces, the spirit of Sisodia Rajputs is unbroken. It is Rana Pratap who still refuses to acknowledge Akbar as the Mughal emperor and vows never to appear in his court in Delhi. 
     

  • Rana Amar Singh 1597 A.D. - 1620 A.D. Pooranmal Nathji Sahsa Ramaji Hastiji Shyamdas Jaswantsingh Shekhji Kalyandas Chanda Kuchra

    Amar Singh succeeds Rana Pratap, and though Akbar leaves Mewar in peace, it is in Jahangir's reign that 17 pitched battles are fought over 10 years. Amar Singh, a true son of his famous father, routs the Mughal forces time and again. But worn down with war and financial losses, Amar Singh negotiates peace with the Mughals. 

    An honourable compromise between Mewar and the Mughals ushers in an era of peace: energy is devoted into building Udaipur and working for the welfare of its people.

  • Rana Karan Singh 1620 A.D. - 1628 A.D. Surajmal

    An abdication, an unusual friendship and peace mark the beginning of a new era. 

    Maharana Amar Singh abdicates in favour of his son, Karan Singh who, at a young age, has been exposed to cordial overtures in Jehangir's court. With young Prince Khurram, he forges a strong friendship. And when the Mughal Prince is exiled, he turns to the Maharana for help. Jagmandir Island Palace, in the middle of Lake Pichola, becomes a safe haven for him. The Suryavanshi ideal - of helping those in distress, irrespective of religion or past enemity - is upheld by Karan Singh, just as it had been by Rana Kumbha and Rana Sanga.

  • Rana Jagat Singh I 1628 A.D. - 1652 A.D. Garibdasot

    Maharana Jagat Singh is credited with being the greatest builder of the dynasty: in his reign, the Jagmandir Island Palace is completed. 

    Painting too is reaching its pinnacle of perfection in these times. Illustrations of religious books and manuscripts, court scenes and important activities are documented for posterity. 

    The quest for excellence in architecture and the arts in Mewar remains unparalleled in the history of medieval India.

  • Rana Raj Singh I 1653 A.D. - 1680 A.D. Ari Singh (Tiroli)

    Peace and respite from war brings with it the responsibility of building Udaipur, developing the City Palace, enlarging the Lake Pichola and creating an effective fresh water network. While Rana Raj Singh builds the Rajsamund Lake to save his people from debilitating drought and famine.It was during his reign that Shrinathji came to Nathdwara and Dwarkadish came to Kankaroli i.e they took shelter in Mewar due to Aurangzeb's destrustive nature.

    Rana Jai Singh constructs the Jaisamund Lake - one of the largest artificial lakes of its time in the world.

  • Rana Jai Singh 1680 A.D. - 1698 A.D. Bheem Singh (Banera) Bahadur Singh (Bhoonwas)

    Peace and respite from war brings with it the responsibility of building Udaipur, developing the City Palace, enlarging the Lake Pichola and creating an effective fresh water network. While Rana Raj Singh builds the Rajsamund Lake to save his people from debilitating drought and famine.It was during his reign that Shrinathji came to Nathdwara and Dwarkadish came to Kankaroli i.e they took shelter in Mewar due to Aurangzeb's destrustive nature.

    Rana Jai Singh constructs the Jaisamund Lake - one of the largest artificial lakes of its time in the world.

  • Rana Amar Singh II 1698 A.D. - 1710 A.D. Umaidsingh (Karoi) Pratap Singh (Bavlas)

    Peace and respite from war brings with it the responsibility of building Udaipur, developing the City Palace, enlarging the Lake Pichola and creating an effective fresh water network. While Rana Raj Singh builds the Rajsamund Lake to save his people from debilitating drought and famine.It was during his reign that Shrinathji came to Nathdwara and Dwarkadish came to Kankaroli i.e they took shelter in Mewar due to Aurangzeb's destrustive nature.

    Rana Jai Singh constructs the Jaisamund Lake - one of the largest artificial lakes of its time in the world.

  • Rana Sangram Singh II 1710 A.D. - 1734 A.D.

    1. Naath Singh(Bagor, Peelghar) -heem Singh ,Surat Singh ,Jalam Singh (Netawal) ,Bhagwat Singh (Peeladar) ,Shivdaan Singh,Sardar Singh (69) ,Sher Singh ,Swaroop Singh (70) ,Sardar Singh , Samrath Singh ,Shakti Singh ,Sohan Singh ,Shambu Singh (71) ,Sajjan Singh (72)

    2. Bagh Singh(Karjali) - Hariron Singh,Daulat Singh, Anoop Singh, Surat Singh, Chatar Singh, Himmat Singh, Lakshman Singh, Jagat Singh, Abhey Singh , Karan Singh

    3. Arjun Singh(Shivrati) - Shiv Singh Bahadur Singh, Suraj Mal Daulat Singh (Dhaneria), Dul Singh, Gaj Singh, Surat Singh

    4. Fateh Singh (73) - Himmat Singh, Shivdaan Singh, Pratap Singh, Hamir Singh, Udai Singh.

    5. Bhagwat Singh (75) - Narendra Singh, Arjun Singh

  • Rana Jagat Singh II 1734 A.D. - 1751 A.D.

    Despair, darkness and the testing times. After centuries of proud resistance and defence against the Turks and the Mughals, Mewar is humbled by the militancy of the marauding Marathas. He built the palace of Jagniwas now the famous Lake Palace Hotel. 

  • Rana Pratap Singh II 1751 A.D. - 1754 A.D. Ari Singh

    In Veer Vinod, the poet Shyamaldas, traces the Kshatriya lineage of Shivaji from Rahap, one of the sons of Kshema Singh. 

    From 1736, when the first Maratha invasion of Mewar takes place in the reign of Maharana Jagat Singh II, the Marathas begin extracting huge tributes and payments, destroying the economic base of Mewar. 

    For almost 40 years, none of the Maharanas are able to counter the greed, rapaciousness and open looting by the Maratha overlords. The glorious descendants of Ikshvaku and Ram, the Maharanas are reduced to abject poverty, unable to lift themselves and their state from the morass of adversity.

  • Maharana Bhim Singh 1778 A.D. - 1828 A.D.

    Mewar's misfortunes multiply as wars of succession break out, with the different Rajput clans pitted against each other. Maharana Bhim Singh is installed as the ruler at the age of ten. He is the First Rana to assume the title of Maharana 

  • Maharana Jawan Singh 1828 A.D - 1838 A.D.

    The demoralisation of Mewar was complete, her fields were deluged with blood and her soil was prey of every paltry marauder." Such is the condition of Mewar into which the British arrive in 1817, bearing with them the Treaty of Paramountcy : the promise of restoring all the hereditary territories and protecting the state from any future invasion. Maharana Bhim Singh welcomes Capt. James Tod(later to become Col Tod), the first Political Agent, who reorganises the state of Mewar and its impoverished economy. Col Tod facilitates the turnaround of Mewar's fortunes and provides a new platform for stability and growth.

  • Maharana Sardar Singh 1838 A.D.- 1842 A.D.

    Victorian stability provides the foundation for the restoration of the lost glory and dignity of the Sisodia dynasty. After the dark days of the Maratha marauders and the civil war, Udaipur is now on the long road to recovery.
    Maharana Sardar Singh, adopted from the Bagore branch of the family, is still caught up in the debts of the past. It is his younger brother, Maharana Swarup Singh who begins the painful journey to recovery. He remains firm on upholding Rajput traditions in the face of British instructions to reform. During the 1857 Mutiny, the Maharana shelters the British refugees on Jagmandir Island Palace and proves, once again, that loyalty and trust are core values being upheld by Kshatriya Kings.

  • Maharana Swarup Singh 1842 A.D. - 1861 A.D.

    Victorian stability provides the foundation for the restoration of the lost glory and dignity of the Sisodia dynasty. After the dark days of the Maratha marauders and the civil war, Udaipur is now on the long road to recovery.
    Maharana Sardar Singh, adopted from the Bagore branch of the family, is still caught up in the debts of the past. It is his younger brother, Maharana Swarup Singh who begins the painful journey to recovery. He remains firm on upholding Rajput traditions in the face of British instructions to reform. During the 1857 Mutiny, the Maharana shelters the British refugees on Jagmandir Island Palace and proves, once again, that loyalty and trust are core values being upheld by Kshatriya Kings.

  • Maharana Shambhu Singh 1861 A.D. - 1874 A.D.

    In Maharana Shambhu Singh's reign, modern reforms are initiated : roads and public utilities, criminal and civil courts, a revitalised police force is established. Education gets top priority from the Maharana who, though not formally educated himself, recognises its value. The first school for girls is built in 1866. Public service and developmental activities become important for the state of Mewar and the Diwans of Eklingji.

  • Maharana Sajjan Singh 1874 A.D. - 1884 A.D.

    The pace of reforms is accelerated by Maharana Sajjan Singh, a very progressive ruler. The High Court is established and new government departments are formed to improve the quality of life in the state of Mewar. Udaipur becomes the second city after Bombay to form a municipality. Plans are drawn up to de-silt the Lake Pichola and afforestation programmes are launched.

    In the study of the arts and history, Maharana Sajjan Singh proves to be a worthy descendant of Rana Kumbha. Learned men in his court, called the navratnas, are encouraged to study, discuss and write treatises on diverse philosophical, historical and literary subjects. Mewari poetry reaches its apex now. Literary and scholarly pursuits bear fruit : Kaviraja Shyamaldas authors Veer Vinod and becomes the curator of the newly-formed Sajjan Vani Vilas library. 

    It is a veritable renaissance under Maharana Sajjan Singh. In a short span of 10 years, the glory of the Sisodia Kings of Mewar is restored.

  • Maharana Fateh Singh 1884 A.D. - 1930 A.D.

    Graciousness and humility, piety and a sense of pride. Maharana Fateh Singh, adopted from the Shivrati branch of the family, proves to be a visionary ruler. 

    Like a true Suryavanshi, he refuses to bow to the dictates of the British and completely overturns the secondary role which British paramountcy is imposing upon him. 

    His courteousness, his strength of character and his strong-willed decisions are made more profound as the Maharana lacks formal education. But he is steeped in traditions of Mewar's history. And his piety derives its strength from the Hindu scriptures. In the 45 years of his reign, Fateh Singh makes it clear to the British that he is not the Maharana by the grace of any Queen of England but by order of his own people and in the service of Lord Eklingji. 

    He devotes himself to developing educational institutes in Udaipur and across the state, encourages the introduction of railway lines from Udaipur, restores old mansions in Chittor and the palace at Kumbhalgarh, builds the The Durbar Hall (now called Fateh Prakash ) and completes the Shiv Niwas Palace as a guesthouse for visitors, extends the water resources of the city by constructing the Feteh Sagar Lake. 

    For a simple man hailing from a modest village, Maharana Fateh Singh indeed brings to life the glories of Mewar. He remains a fountainhead of inspiration as he fulfills the Kshatriya vows of honour, decency and hospitality in his long reign.

  • Maharana Bhupal Singh 1930 A.D. - 1955 A.D

    With a vision to lead in an age of turbulence. Maharana Bhupal Singh as the ruler of Mewar guides its destiny through India's most momentous period, the Independence from British Imperial rule. 

    Like Rana Pratap's heroic defence against the Mughals, Maharana Bhupal Singh's vision is born out of a deep sense of patriotism and pride in upholding the core values of Suryavanshi Kings. Confined to a wheelchair with a crippling spinal disorder, the Maharana's personal courage at all times exemplifies the triumph of the human spirit. 

    He is aware of the dynamic social changes sweeping across the country and encourages the orderly growth of social and political movements. Like his famous ancestors who were relentless reformers in the field of education, the Maharana establishes the Rana Pratap Hindi University at Chittor and an Agricultural College at Udaipur. Schools, specially for girls, are set up. 

    He is a committed environmentalist, organising longterm afforestation programmes for the Aravalli Hills. Sustained industrial activity makes the Mewar economy more vibrant in his reign. 

    With Independence, comes Maharana Bhupal Singh's finest hour. The ruler, who stood to lose the entire governance of his kingdom, became the first State to merge with the Indian Union. His historic words, echo the glory of Rana Sangha and Rana Pratap : "Today is a day of which to be greatly proud. India is independent. It brings to fulfillment the 1400 years' struggle and endeavour of my forefathers. It becomes my holy duty, on behalf of my ancestors, to hand over to the leaders of free India, this cherished and sacred Flame of Freedom to the country as a whole." 

    Maharana Bhupal Singh, acting honourably as the Diwan of Eklingji, serves the interests and welfare of his people even though it spells the end of Mewar's sovereignty which begins with Guhaditya and is proudly defended for 1500 years. The grateful government of India nominates him as "Maharaj Pramukh", the only one of its kind in whole of India

  • Maharana Bhagwat Singh Mewar 1955 A.D. - 1984 A.D.

    New challenges of a new age 
    Bhagwat Singh, a great-nephew of Maharana Fateh Singh, is adopted from the Shivrati branch of the family, and is witness to the epochal changes in independent India. Leading an ordinary life before he is adopted as son and heir to Maharana Bhupal Singh, Bhagwat Singh measures up to the extraordinary circumstances and demonstrates his determination to respect the legacy of Bapa Rawal. 

    Maharana Bhagwat Singh is one of the first rulers to realise the potential of 'adapting' palaces and forts into luxury hotels. The Lake Palace Hotel becomes a hugely successful venture, firmly putting Udaipur on the world tourism map. His corporate endeavours stand the House of Mewar in good stead when the Indian Government deals a terrible blow : In 1969, the Privy Purse is abolished, the rulers are stripped of their titles and privileges. Maharana Bhagwat Singh, now Mr Bhagwat Singh Mewar, makes a dignified appeal to Mrs Indira Gandhi, writing "it shall be an honour for me to be of service to the country, save only that I cannot accept to be instrumental in derogation of the institution to which I belong." 
    The focus is on social welfare : The Maharana Mewar Foundation is formed. Education and community welfare projects are initiated. Annual awards are instituted to reward services rendered to society. 

    In his Will and Testament of 1984, Bhagwat Singh recreates the Institution of the Maharana, ensuring the name of Maharana will continue in perpetuity. His eldest son, Mahendra Singh, voluntarily disinherited himself from the family. The custodianship of the House of Mewar passes on to the younger son, Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur. 
    The timeless legacy of Bapa Rawal is thus protected. And the Diwans of Eklingji continue their service through the 20th century. 

    Maharana Bhagwat Singh, on the invitation of Prime Minister Nehru, visits New Delhi : fulfilling the vows of his forefathers never to enter the capital-city so long as it is under foreign rule.

  • Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur 1984 A.D. - the present Mahendra Singh Lakshyaraj Singh

    "I believe in the past, but my feet are firmly rooted in the present and I'm constantly thinking about the future." 

    With these profound words, Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur, the younger son of Maharana Bhagwat Singh, is spearheading the process of modernisation initiated by his illustrious father.

    Shriji, as Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur is reverentially known as, is upholding the honourable values of Kshatriya kingship in an age when there are no kings. His empire today is a corporate one : developing palace-resorts and hotels, promoting of Polo and accelerating the pace of ongoing philanthropic activities. 

    The guiding principles of Bapa Rawal -- self-reliance, self-respect and the dignity of Man -- are as relevant for him today as they were to his forefathers. "Change rarely invalidates the past and it does not necessarily imply a rejection of the old. A great deal can - and should be - preserved from the past. In particular we should treasure the ancient and selfless values that have stood the test of time," says Shriji, the present custodian of the House of Mewar and the 76th Diwan of Eklingji. 

    Shriji has been preserving a vibrant cultural heritage enshrined in The City Palace, Udaipur in Rajasthan. As the Chairman and Managing Trustee of the Maharana Mewar Charitable Foundation (MMCF), Udaipur, Shriji is managing a spectrum of philanthropic and charitable activities emanating from the City Palace in Udaipur. Several non profit and commercial organisations are seamlessly networked to exemplify ‘Eternal Mewar’ for global and Indian audiences. The Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation, Vidyadan Trust, Maharana Mewar Historical Publications Trust, and Rajmata Gulab Kunwar Charitable Trust have emerged as the public charitable trusts responsible for more than 50 developmental projects in and around Udaipur. The City Palace Museum, Maharana Mewar Special Library, Maharana Mewar Research Institute, the publications division and educational institutes are some of the key projects being managed and developed by the Trusts. 

    HRH Group of Hotels, Udaipur, is the flagship commercial venture of the House of Mewar. HRH Group of Hotels is India’s largest and only chain of heritage palace-hotels and resorts under private ownership. Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur is the Chairman and Managing Director of the HRH Group of Hotels that offers regal experiences in island-palaces, museums, galleries, car collections, and much more. 

    History and the blessings of Eklingji are with Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur as he works towards turning his vision into a reality, taking the House of Mewar into the new millennium.

  • There in the highest heaven

    Dwell and reign those Gods who bear in common

    The name of Adityas...

    They are inviolable, imperishable, eternal beings...

    Their essence is the celestial light.

    They are the eternal sustainers of this luminous life which exists behind all phenomena.

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    Guhaditya - Mahendra II
    157 - 163

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    Kalbhoj Bapa
    164

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    Kalbhoj Bapa - Salivahan
    164 - 175

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    Shakti Kumar - Run Singh
    176 - 189

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    Kshem Singh - Kshetra Singh
    190 - 200

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    Lakha - Sanga
    201 - 206

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    Kumbha
    203

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    Sanga
    206

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    Meerabai
    Rana Sanga's Daughter-in-Law

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    Ratan Singh - Udai Singh
    207- 209

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    Pratap Singh - Amar Singh
    210 - 211

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    Karan Singh - Amar Singh II
    212 - 216

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    Sangram Singh
    217

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    Jagat Singh II - Javan Singh
    218 - 224

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    Sardar Singh - Sajjan Singh
    225 - 228

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    Fateh Singh
    229

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    Bhupal Singh
    230

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    Bhagwat Singh
    231

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    Shriji Arvind Singh Mewar of Udaipur
    232

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    Mr. Lakshyaraj Singh Mewar of Udaipur
    233

MAHARANA ARVIND SINGH 
MEWAR 1984 A.D.

A multifaceted personality, Shriji has been preserving a vibrant cultural heritage enshrined in The City Palace Complex, Udaipur in Rajasthan. As the Chairman and Managing Trustee of the Maharana Mewar Charitable Foundation (MMCF), Udaipur, Shriji is managing a spectrum of philanthropic and charitable activities emanating from the City Palace Complex in Udaipur. Several non-profit and commercial organizations are seamlessly networked to exemplify ‘Eternal Mewar’ for global and Indian audiences.

MAHARANA BHAGWAT SINGH
MEWAR 1955 AD - 1984 AD (75TH CUSTODIAN)

New challenges of a new age

Bhagwat Singh who was a great-nephew of Maharana Fateh Singh, was adopted from the Shivrati branch of the family, and witnessed the epochal changes in independent India. He led an ordinary life before he was adopted as son and heir to Maharana Bhupal Singh. Bhagwat Singh measured up to the extraordinary circumstances, which came up after India gained her independence and demonstrated his determination to respect the legacy of the founder Bapa Rawal. 
Maharana 

MAHARANA BHUPAL SINGH 
1930 AD - 1955 AD (74TH CUSTODIAN)

Maharana Bhupal Singh who succeeded Fateh Singh formally ascended the gaddi in 1930 had been exercising power since 1921 as a result of British intervention. With a vision to lead in an age of turbulence. Maharana Bhupal Singh as the ruler of Mewar guided its destiny through India’s most momentous period, the Independence from British Imperial rule. Like Rana Pratap’s heroic defence against the Mughals, Maharana Bhupal Singh’s vision was born out of a deep sense of patriotism and pride in upholding the core values of Suryavanshi Kings. Confined to a wheelchair with a crippling spinal disorder, the Maharana’s personal courage at all times exemplified the triumph of the human spirit. 
He was aware of the dynamic social changes sweeping across the country and encouraged the orderly growth of social and political movements. Like his famous ancestors who were relentless reformers in the field of education, the Maharana established the Rana Pratap Hindi University at Chittor and an Agricultural College at Udaipur. Schools, especially for girls, were set up. He reformed the judicial powers in his state. He also paid a lot of attention to irrigation works and began the construction of the Bhupal Singh Dam. By 1935, he had set up fifteen dispensaries in various parts of his town. He reformed the local coinage too. (Hooja: 2006, p.1019-1014). 
He was a committed environmentalist, organising long-term afforestation programmes for the Aravalli Hills. Sustained industrial activity made the Mewar economy more vibrant in his reign. The modern exploitation of the long known and famous Zawar mines rich with their zinc, silver and lead content began during his reign. With Independence, came Maharana Bhupal Singh’s finest hour. The ruler, who stood to lose the entire governance of his kingdom, became the first State to merge with the indian Union. His historic words echoed the glory of Rana Sanga and Rana Pratap: “Today is a day of which to be greatly proud. India is independent. It brings to fulfilment the 1500 years’ struggle and endeavour of my forefathers. It becomes my holy duty, on behalf of my ancestors, to hand over to the leaders of free India, this cherished and sacred Flame of Freedom to the country as a whole.” 
Maharana Bhupal Singh, acting honourably as the Diwan of Eklingji, served the interests and welfare of his people even though it spelt the end of Mewar’s sovereignty, which began with Guhaditya and was proudly defended for 1500 years. The grateful Government of India nominated him as “Maharaj Pramukh”, the only title of its kind in whole of India.

MAHARANA FATEH SINGH
1884 A.D. - 1930 A.D. (73RD CUSTODIAN)

Maharana Fateh Singh, adopted from the Shivrati branch of the family, proved to be a visionary ruler and he held the gaddi of Mewar for nearly half a century and his period witnessed the most drastic of all changes. His reign saw further modernisation of administration and the opening of new educational institutions, medical facilities, roads, and irrigation works among other things. Further land revenue settlements were also carried out during his period. 
Like a true Suryavanshi, Graciousness and humility, piety and a sense of pride were instilled in him and he refused to bow to the dictates of the British and completely overturned the secondary role, which British paramountcy imposed upon him. In December 1911 he went to Delhi on the occasion of the Delhi Durbar to mark the visit of King George the V and Queen Mary, however he did not take his seat in the Durbar. His piety derived its strength from the Hindu scriptures. In the 45 years of his reign, Fateh Singh made it clear to the British that he was not the Maharana by the grace of any Queen of England but by order of his own people and in the service of Lord Eklingji. 
For a simple man hailing from a modest village, Maharana Fateh Singh indeed brought to life the glories of Mewar. He remained a fountainhead of inspiration as he fulfilled the Kshatriya vows of honour, decency and hospitality in his long reign. Though the Maharana was advised to abdicate in favour of his nominated heir, he refused to oblige. However he died around 9 years later at the age of eighty on May 20th 1930.

MAHARANA ARVIND SINGH MEWAR 1984 A.D.

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Maharana Bhagwat Singh Mewar 1955 AD - 1984 AD

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Maharana Bhupal Singh 1930 AD - 1955 AD

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Maharana Fateh Singh 1884 A.D. - 1930 A.D

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